Things tagged 'tfl_better_junctions'

16 issues found for 'tfl_better_junctions':

  • London Assembly investigation: Walking & Cycling at Outer London Junctions

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    London Assembly says: Our investigation What different approaches could TfL and London boroughs take to improve junctions and increase walking and cycling in Outer London? Small pockets of improvement don’t change the fact that most London streets are dominated by traffic and noise. They are hostile places even to step out into for a pint of milk. On behalf of the London Assembly Transport Committee, Caroline Russell AM is investigating how our streets and junctions can become more people-friendly. Get involved There are a number of specific questions the Committee is seeking to answer. Please address any questions where you have relevant views and information to share, and feel free to cover any other issues you would like the Committee to consider. Are there lessons to be learned from previous junction improvements? How can we enable more people to walk and cycle? How can we make our streets and junctions less hostile to people getting around by bike and on foot? How do you get all road users on board? Please email transportcommittee@london.gov.uk by August 11 and share the investigation on Twitter using #OuterLondonJunctions Key Facts The Mayor and TfL are promoting walking and cycling as a form of active travel and a way to reduce health inequalities - however, currently, over 40 percent of Londoners fall short of the recommended 150 minutes of activity per week. TfL research has found that people who live in Outer London tend to walk less than those who live in Inner London. Public transport coverage is lower and car ownership is higher in Outer London, with cars making up a larger share of journeys. In particular, people who live in Outer London are less likely to walk children to school, walk to see friends or relatives, and walk to pubs, restaurants and cinemas. In 2015: 53 percent of Inner Londoners walked at least five journeys a week, compared to 35 percent of Outer Londoners 47 percent of Inner Londoners walked as part of longer journeys on other forms of transport at least five times a week, compared to 41 percent of Outer Londoners

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  • Cycle Superhighway CS9 Kensington Olympia to Brentford town centre

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    TfL says: In close consultation with our partners the London Borough of Hounslow and the London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham, we are seeking your views on proposals to transform roads in west Kensington, Hammersmith, Chiswick and Brentford town centre to make cycling and walking easier, safer, and more appealing. Cycle Superhighway 9 (CS9) would provide improvements for all road users and communities on the alignment, offering a clearer and safer route for people to cycle in west London, making it easier to cross busy roads and removing through traffic on some residential roads. Changing the layout of many of the roads along the CS9 route would create a more appealing environment for everyone to enjoy. CS9 would form part of an emerging network of Cycle Superhighways. These are an important part of the Mayor's draft Transport Strategy and Healthy Streets Approach, which aim to encourage walking, cycling and using public transport, and make London greener, healthier and more pleasant. Transforming road layouts is not without impacts, and there are difficult choices to be made in determining the layout for roads on the alignment. For example, our proposed changes would affect travel times through the area for many people. We want to hear your views on these proposals during this public consultation. We are actively reviewing ways in which we could change the design and optimise the way roads would operate, and we will consider views submitted during the consultation period. The proposed changes between Kensington Olympia and Brentford town centre include: Two-way segregated cycle track on Hammersmith Road, King Street and Chiswick High Road Five new signal-controlled pedestrian crossings and over 20 upgraded pedestrian crossings Reducing through traffic and rat-running in residential roads by restricting access to the South Circular from Wellesley Road and Stile Hall Gardens for motor vehicles, making these streets more appealing places to walk and cycle Stepped cycle tracks (at a lower height than the footway) in each direction on Brentford High Street; eastbound stepped track on Kew Bridge Road, westbound cycle path through Waterman’s Park Changes to bus stop locations and layouts, including new bus stop bypasses for cyclists Changes to parking and loading bays and hours of operation Where would Cycle Superhighway 9 go? This section of CS9 would provide a continuous, largely-segregated route between Kensington Olympia and Brentford town centre, via Hammersmith and Chiswick. High volumes of cyclists currently use eastern sections of the proposed CS9 route where there are no protected facilities for them, and many journeys currently made in the area via less active modes could be made by foot or by bike. The route would connect with Russell Road at the eastern extent, where a Quietway cycle route may be installed in future. It would also connect to a proposed Quietway cycle route off King Street in the vicinity of St Peter’s Garden, providing upgraded walking and cycling connections between Hammersmith and Twickenham along the A316. Consultation on these proposals would take place next year. Click here for more information on Quietways. At the western extent, the current proposals would facilitate safe access for cyclists back into the carriageway before the junction with Dock Road. We are working closely with the London Borough of Hounslow to develop proposals to extend CS9 further west through Brentford and towards Hounslow. We expect to hold a public consultation on this section in late 2018. Why are we proposing this? Cycle Superhighway 9 is designed to help us meet the target set out in the Mayor's draft Transport Strategy of changing the way people choose to travel so that 80% of all London trips are made by foot, bicycle or public transport by 2041, up from 64% today. Over 3000 trips are already being made daily by people who cycle on some of the streets where improvements are proposed. In addition, areas of this route in Chiswick, Hammersmith and Kensington Olympia have some of the highest concentration of pedestrians in the city. Along the A205 South Circular section of CS9 by Kew Bridge Station, cycling is up nearly six fold and all motor traffic is down by over 20% since 2000. Across London, there are now more than 670,000 cycle trips a day, an increase of over 130 per cent since 2000, making cycling a major mode of transport in the capital. Improving safety for people who want to walk and cycle CS9 would provide a clearer and safer route for cycling in west London, largely separated from other vehicles. This alignment provides a direct route in the heart of town centres in west London, with good connectivity to other local roads. Roads on the alignment are currently dominated by motor traffic and can be intimidating and unpleasant places to walk and cycle. Walking and cycling are the healthiest and most sustainable ways to travel, either for whole trips or as part of longer journeys on public transport. By giving people space and time to cycle through the area more easily, and by providing improved crossing facilities for pedestrians, we can encourage more people to use these healthy and sustainable forms of transport while keeping other traffic moving. These improvements would help to make these streets work better for walking, cycling and public transport, so both individuals and the community as a whole can benefit. Facilitating and encouraging active travel in west London We want to make it easier for people in west London to use sustainable travel and lead active lifestyles. We also want to make the streets on the CS9 alignment healthier, safer and more welcoming places for everyone. The proposals form part of the Mayor of London’s plan for Healthy Streets a long-term vision to encourage more Londoners to walk and cycle by making London’s streets healthier, safer and more welcoming. Currently, only 34% of Londoners take 20 minutes of physical activity on any given day. The new cycle facilities would help to encourage people to use active modes of transport, which could achieve significant health benefits. The proposals aim to encourage people who would like to cycle, but currently feel unable to do so. A network of Cycle Superhighways exists in north, south and east London, but none in west London. Our proposals would bring a high-quality cycle facility to west London, linking town centres in Hammersmith, Chiswick and Brentford. Data from existing Cycle Superhighways suggest the new route would also draw cyclists away from other routes that are less suitable for them. The introduction of the East-West and North-South Cycle Superhighways in central London has seen significant increases in cycling as a mode of transport Connecting and improving town centres Our proposals would help connect town centres from Kensington Olympia through Hammersmith, Chiswick and Brentford, linking important amenities and facilities in the heart of these town centres, and making them more pleasant places to live, work, shop and spend time. To make it easier to cross busy roads here, we would install five new pedestrian crossings and upgrade over 20 others. We would also install new seating areas to provide space for people to stop, rest and spend time in these town centres. This would be supported by other improvements to the street environment, including new trees. As well as enabling more Londoners to walk and cycle more often, these proposals would help to create more welcoming and inclusive streets. When would we build Cycle Superhighway 9? Subject to the outcome of this consultation, any subsequent follow-up consultations and approvals from partner boroughs, we intend to commence construction on Cycle Superhighway 9 from Kensington Olympia to Brentford town centre in late 2018, and carry out further consultation on the detailed proposals from Brentford to Hounslow in late 2018. We would plan construction carefully to minimise disruption to those who live, work and travel through the areas. As part of this planning, we would coordinate closely with other construction works in the area, and consider alternative ways of working including advance works, weekends and evenings. We would also carry out an extensive communications and engagement campaign to ensure residents, businesses and others travelling through the works areas have the information they need to plan ahead and adapt their travel arrangements where necessary, reducing any impact on their journeys and operations during the construction period. How would Cycle Superhighway 9 affect journey times? We have carried out detailed traffic modelling on the proposals for Cycle Superhighway 9, to understand how our proposals might affect journey times for general traffic, buses, cyclists and pedestrians. Despite the sophistication of our traffic models, all traffic modelling is only ever indicative; it is intended to give an idea of where the impacts of changes in journeys are most likely to be felt. It assumes that drivers have perfect knowledge of the network and will always choose the quickest route available. Traffic modelling has been carried out to study the traffic impacts of the scheme at the busiest times of the day, and results are presented for both the morning and evening peak hours. TfL would actively monitor and manage the road network following implementation to ensure impacts were balanced. To understand the impacts, we have assessed how London's roads would operate in 2021, considering population growth, committed developments and other road improvements including the scheme at Hammersmith Gyratory as consulted (details of this scheme are available here). We then test how London's roads would operate in 2021 with the changes proposed as part of the scheme. This allows us to isolate the predicted impacts of CS9 from other changes which are not part of this consultation. Changes to parking and loading Our proposals include changes to parking and loading bays and their hours of operation across the proposed route. We will contact premises which we think could be affected during the consultation period. If you think the proposals could affect you or your business, please contact us to let us know. We encourage you to discuss these proposals with your suppliers. Environmental impacts Although not a traffic generating scheme, our proposals would change how traffic moves around the area, which may result in some associated and localised changes to air quality and noise levels. Environmental surveys and modelling would take place as part of our ongoing evaluation of these proposals. Our proposals aim to improve the quality of life in the area by: Reducing the dominance of traffic, allowing people to better enjoy the area Improving pedestrian crossings and cycle facilities, to encourage people to walk and cycle through the area Protecting bus journey times, to encourage people to use public transport We will be carrying-out environmental evaluation and environmental modelling to help our evaluation of the proposals Air pollution is one of the most significant challenges facing London, affecting the health of all Londoners. As part of the plans for new measures to tackle London’s current poor air quality, we are consulting on proposals to bring forward the introduction of the London Ultra Low Emission Zone (ULEZ). A number of other schemes to improve London's air quality are planned including taking steps to reduce air pollution from our bus fleet, reducing emissions from taxis and private hire vehicles, setting up five ‘Low Emission Neighbourhoods’ and expanding the electric vehicle charging network, making it simpler to use. We are investing to make London’s streets healthy, safe and attractive places to walk and cycle. Enabling more journeys to be made on foot or by bike can help reduce private vehicle use and associated emissions. See here for more information on how we are creating Healthy Streets. Equalities How TfL fulfils its obligations under the Equality Act 2010 We are subject to the general public sector equality duty set out in section 149 of the Equality Act 2010, which requires us to have due regard to the need to eliminate discrimination, advance equality of opportunity and foster good relations by reference to people with protected characteristics. The protected characteristics are: age, disability, gender reassignment, marriage and civil partnership, pregnancy and maternity, race, religion or belief, sex and sexual orientation. As part of our decision-making process on the proposals for Cycle Superhighways, we have had due regard to any impacts on those with protected characteristics and the need to ensure that their interests are taken into account. In considering the design of our streets, we closely consider the needs of all users throughout the design process. On significant infrastructure projects, such as Cycle Superhighways, we: Complete Equality Impact Assessments (EQIAs) at the outset of the project, to review potential impacts on equality target groups, including disabled people Carry out public consultations, including targeted engagement with specific users such as (among many others): Royal National Institute of Blind People, Guide Dogs, Age UK, Transport for All, and National Autistic Society Ensure we comply with established guidance – such as the Design Manual for Roads and Bridges – which includes detailed requirements for disabled people The EQIA completed for CS9 shows positive impacts for black and ethnic minority groups, females, disabled cyclists, and cyclists under 25 and over 65 years of age. Positive impacts have also been identified for disabled pedestrians, as the scheme involves a number of improvements to pedestrian facilities including enhanced crossing facilities, increased footway widths and new pedestrian crossings. Some negative impacts have been identified where footways are cut back or shared use footway is introduced. However the minimum 2 metre standard for footway widths has been maintained to allow two wheelchair users to pass safely, or up to 3 metre footway widths in areas of shared use footway. Kerb-protected cycle facilities, which lead to positive impacts for people with protected characteristics when they are cycling, work most effectively when they feature bus stop bypasses. Bus stop bypasses and their impacts are described below. Crossing cycle tracks on Cycle Superhighway 9 - a guide for disabled users How do I cross cycle tracks? All crossings of cycle tracks would be on one level, with step-free access from one footway to another and clearly marked out with tactile paving. At road junctions with traffic lights Some junctions would have a “formal” signalised crossing point across both road and cycle track - marked with contrasting blister tactile paving that extends in a ‘tail’ to the back of the footway. Here: cyclists are held at a red light pedestrians cross both road and cycle track at the same time as there would typically be no waiting area between road and cycle track this crossing would be marked using contrasting blister tactile paving with a tactile tail extending to the back of the footway and dropped kerbs audible signals and a pedestrian countdown would be used where feasible, and all push button units would have a tactile rotating cone. Other junctions would have an “informal” crossing point – where the road crossing may be signalised but the cycle track is not. Here: the signalised road crossing would be marked with red tactile paving and a tactile ‘tail’ extending to the back of the footway the cycle track crossing would be marked by contrasting blister tactile paving without a ‘tail’ there would be a waiting area to between the cycle track and the road at least 2.5m wide and free of intrusive street furniture to ensure space for a wheelchair to turn. At signalised (green man) road crossings All proposed crossings would be fully signal-controlled - with a green man. All existing zebra crossings of the main road would be converted to signal-controlled crossings. Some junctions would have a signalised crossing point across both road and cycle track - marked using red tactile paving with a tactile ‘tail’ extending to the back of the footway. Here cyclists are held at a red light pedestrians cross both road and cycle track at the same time as there would typically be no waiting area between road and cycle track At other junctions, there would be an “informal” crossing point – where the main road crossing is signalised but the cycle track crossing is not. Here: the main road crossing would be marked with red tactile paving and a tactile ‘tail’ extending to the back of the footway the cycle track crossing would be marked by yellow tactile paving with no ‘tail’ there would be a waiting area between the cycle track and the road at least 2.4m wide At road crossings that are not signal-controlled Most crossings without signals would be removed or converted to signal-controlled. Where an un-signalised crossing remains (e.g. on King Street by Ravenscourt Park), the cycle track crossing point would not be signalised either. It would be marked with contrasting blister tactile paving with no ‘tail’ and a waiting area of at least 2.5m would be provided between road and cycle track. How do I get in or out of a car/taxi? In a marked bay next to the cycle track Marked parking bays would be provided next to the cycle track. A buffer of at least 0.5 metres between the bay and the track will run flush along the length of the bay. Vehicles with side ramps could deploy them into the cycle track. Same level-access would be provided between the cycle track and footway. Disabled users would be permitted to park in loading bays in: London Borough of Hounslow London Borough of Hammersmith & Fulham on the Transport for London Road Network. Not in a marked bay next to the cycle track Marked bays would be the best places to stop and get in or out of a vehicle in safety and comfort along Cycle Superhighway 9. Space for general traffic would be reduced to a single lane in each direction in some places and all single yellow lines would be replaced with “no waiting or loading at any time” restrictions. Also the kerbed islands between the cycle track and the road, varying in width from 0.5 metres to 2.5 metres, are generally not wide enough for vehicles to deploy ramps onto the island itself. How do I get on and off a bus at a stop next to the cycle track? “Bus stop bypasses” would be provided. Here, the cycle track continues behind the bus stop at carriageway level, providing continuous segregation from motor traffic for people cycling. Bus passengers access a waiting area by crossing the cycle track using a raised, marked crossing point. The waiting area would be at least 2.5 metres wide. Pedestrians would cross the cycle track at raised, marked crossing points to continue their journey. The footway also continues behind the cycle track. The bus stop flag would be situated at the left of the crossing point to make the stop easier to find. Kerbs would be high enough (125-140millimetres) to ensure TfL buses can deploy ramps onto the island. Our research has found that bus stop bypasses are safe for all road users, including bus passengers. Routing cycle traffic away from the road is an effective way to create safe, attractive cycling facilities along bus routes. The risk of conflict between cycles and pedestrians has been found to be very low, while providing a dedicated crossing point for bus passengers and design features that encourage slower cycling help to make the bus stop area more comfortable for everyone to use. Bus stop bypasses are used across Europe and there are a number of examples in operation or planned across the UK, including in Brighton, Manchester and Cambridge, as well as in London. We introduced some bus stop bypasses on the Cycle Superhighway 2 (CS2) extension between Bow and Stratford in autumn 2013, and across other Cycle Superhighways in 2015-16. We monitor the entire Cycle Superhighway network to ensure it is operating safely and effectively. This includes more than 50 bus stop bypasses across the capital. We are satisfied bus stop bypasses are safe for all road users. We are continuing to engage with accessibility and cycling groups and carry out additional research into the type and layout of pedestrian crossings at bus stop bypasses. We have a dedicated working group overseeing on-street trialling of the use of zebra crossings over cycle tracks at bus stop bypasses. This group includes representatives from Transport for All, the Royal National Institute of Blind People, Guide Dogs, Age UK London, London TravelWatch, Cycling Embassy of Great Britain, Living Streets, the London Cycling Campaign and Cycling UK. We will incorporate findings of these further investigations, including the outcomes of discussions about the trial with the working group, into final proposals for CS4. At five bus stops on Brentford High Street where space is limited and expected cycle flows are lower, the footway and waiting area would be combined and all pedestrians would cross the cycle track at raised, marked crossing points at each end of the island to continue their journey via the waiting area island. The combined footway and waiting area would be a minimum of 2.5 metres wide, to ensure bus stop accessibility is maintained. Tactile paving We would use tactile paving on all crossings and traffic islands along the CS9 route. Tactile paving would be designed according to Department for Transport guidance. We would apply local standards used by our partner boroughs. Accessibility for cyclists with disabilities CS9 would be suitable for use by disabled cyclists using adapted bicycles, such as hand cycles and tricycles. The designs adhere as closely as possible to the principles for inclusive cycling set out in our London Cycling Design Standards. Cycle tracks on CS9 would be as wide as possible and a smooth riding surface would be provided, with the entire cycle route to be resurfaced. How do previous proposals relate to Cycle Superhighway 9? Previous consultations on measures to improve some of these streets have already taken place. Hammersmith Gyratory In January 2017, TfL approved proposals to create dedicated space for cyclists on the northern side of Hammersmith gyratory with the support of Hammersmith & Fulham Council. For more information on the Hammersmith gyratory consultation that took place in spring 2016, please click here. Our proposals for CS9 would enhance the benefits provided by this scheme by extending the two-way cycle track on King Street to ensure cyclists do not have to mix with general traffic when travelling westbound through the area. We have listened to residents’ concerns over the reduction in capacity for general traffic on Beadon Road. We have updated our proposal here to ensure traffic can flow more freely through the junction with Hammersmith Grove. We would do this by signalising the junction of Beadon Road and Hammersmith Grove. Currently, vehicles exiting Hammersmith Grove and pedestrians crossing Beadon Road are uncontrolled. This can constrain the amount of traffic on Beadon Road that can flow into Hammersmith Gyratory. Controlling these movements with traffic signals would increase capacity for general traffic on Beadon Road which is the principal route for through traffic here. This revised design would also allow us to provide a new signal-controlled pedestrian crossing over Beadon Road on the western arm of the junction, which would accommodate growth from surrounding developments. This would also provide enough time for vehicles making local trips to exit Hammersmith Grove and join Beadon Road. In addition, no new bus lane is proposed on Beadon Road in this design. This means more space for general traffic is retained for approximately 170 metres where bus lane had previously been proposed, but results in longer journeys for people travelling by bus. We will continue to look for ways to minimise or remove increases to bus journey times as much as possible. Click [here] for detailed traffic impacts of the proposals, including a comparison with the consulted scheme at Hammersmith Gyratory. We remain committed to delivering improvements at Hammersmith Gyratory. Subject to the outcome of this consultation, we would look to deliver these improvements as part of CS9. We intend to start construction of all improvements in Hammersmith Gyratory in late 2018, subject to the outcome of this consultation, any subsequent follow-up consultations and agreeing proposals with partner boroughs. Wellesley Road (traffic reduction) In summer 2016, the London Borough of Hounslow carried out a survey on traffic issues with residents and businesses in the Wellesley Road and Stile Hall Gardens area. The responses received indicated high levels of concern at the volume of through traffic – 73% responded that there is too much non-residential traffic in the area - and the impact of this on several issues including road safety, attractiveness of the road for walking and cycling and pollution. In late 2016, LB Hounslow consulted on proposals to reduce through traffic in the area. The majority of respondents (55%) were in favour of a closure/no entry to restrict access, and closing access to the South Circular from Wellesley Road and Stile Hall Gardens was the favoured change option (48%, or 87% of all responses in favour of change). These measures would reduce traffic on roads through the area, including Wellesley Road, Stile Hall Gardens and Heathfield Terrace. According to surveys carried out in summer 2016, up to 75% of vehicles travelling through this residential area is non-residential through traffic. Reducing traffic volumes on these roads would reduce congestion at peak periods, improve access for residents, make it easier for pedestrians to cross these roads and significantly improve conditions for cyclists using them. A3320 Warwick Road Safety Scheme In 2016, TfL consulted on proposals to improve pedestrian and cycling facilities around the junction of Kensington High Street with Warwick Road and Addison Road. These improvements are unaffected by CS9 proposals, and we intend to implement them early next year.

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  • Camberwell Green junction

    Created by Elizabeth E. // 1 thread

    TfL are making changes to junction because of safety issues. For Cyclists: Two-stage right turns at the junction in the west to south and east to north directions An early release at the traffic lights on all four arms of the junction Deeper Advanced Stop Lines (ASLs) Mandatory cycle lane on Camberwell Church Street westbound approach to operate at all times St Giles bus stop moved further west from the Vicarage Grove junction to improve safety of left turning cyclists on the LCN 23 cycle route Resurfacing throughout the junction. Retention of the 20mph speed limit at the junction and on all the approaches.

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  • Transforming Fiveways Croydon

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    TfL says: Working in partnership with Croydon Council, we are proposing major changes to the road layout in Waddon, Croydon. Currently congestion is high, bus passengers frequently experience delays, and there is poor provision for cyclists and pedestrians. Our proposals would make Fiveways junction simpler and increase capacity to accommodate expected traffic growth arising from population and economic growth in the area. The project would also improve conditions for walking and cycling, with better cycle links between central Croydon and Sutton, and simpler pedestrian journeys and new public spaces. The proposals aim to make the streets more accessible and people-friendly, supporting the development of Waddon as a local centre. What are we proposing? Following our 2015 consultation on initial proposals, we are now planning the following changes: A23 Purley Way, Waddon Station Bridge / A232 Croydon Road Replacing the A23 (Purley Way) bridge over the railway with a wider structure (and realigning it to the west) to ease traffic congestion and installing new semi-segregated cycle lanes. This would require acquisition of property to the west of the bridge Fiveways Corner, Waddon Simplifying Fiveways Corner by realigning Denning Avenue to reduce the number of junction arms from five to four. This would require acquisition of property at Fiveways Corner Providing signalised pedestrian and cycle crossings and cycle advanced stop lines on all arms of the junction Creating a new public space and installing new cycle parking A232 Epsom Road Improving pedestrian access to Waddon Station by widening footways and improving crossing facilities Introducing segregated ‘stepped’ cycle lanes in both directions, removing all parking bays and converting Epsom Road to two-way traffic from the junction with the A23 to Duppas Hill Road Permitting the left-turn from the A23 into Epsom Road A232 Stafford Road Introducing a new northbound bus lane on Stafford Road between Fiveways Corner and the junction with Epsom Road, and creating inset parking bays on Stafford Road to allow for safer cycling and bus lane widening Banning the left turn from Stafford Road into Epsom Road Why are we proposing this? We want to make the Waddon area a safer, more accessible and pleasant place for all users. The current road layout was not designed to handle the current levels of traffic and, with further growth expected in the London Borough of Croydon and more widely, we need to make changes to ensure the road network supports this growth. The proposals aim to: Upgrade the public space and the pedestrian environment throughout the Fiveways area and support Croydon Council’s aspiration to develop Waddon as a local centre Provide enhanced cycling facilities to link with existing and proposed cycle routes into and out of Central Croydon Improve pedestrian, cyclist and bus-user access to Waddon station, and public transport Increase traffic capacity along the A23 and A232 and reduce congestion, allowing for future growth Improve journey times for all road users using the A23 and A232 in the Fiveways area Following our earlier consultation in 2015, we are now inviting your views on our detailed design proposals. Road layout changes A23 Purley Way As part of the scheme, we propose to realign and widen Waddon Station bridge. This proposal provides an opportunity to replace the bridge, which would otherwise require significant work to maintain by 2031. To enable these improvements it would be necessary to replace the existing bridge with a wider structure, which would be relocated west of the current alignment. This would mean that some property immediately to the west of the existing bridge would need to be acquired. Our proposals would: Increase the number of traffic lanes from two to three in each direction Introduce two-metre wide cycle lanes in both directions on the A23 bridge, with segregation at junctions for left turns, improving cycling connections Create footways with a minimum of two metre width on each side of the carriageway An artist’s impression of junction of A232 Croydon Road with A23 Purley Way Epsom Road Opening up Epsom Road to two way traffic. This would remove A232 traffic from the junction at Fiveways Corner. The carriageway would be widened to the north side only Introducing new 1.5 metre wide ‘stepped’ cycle lanes in both directions on Epsom Road to provide a new east-west cycle link from Croydon Road to Duppas Hill Road Removing the parking bays from Epsom Road to provide space for two-way traffic and new cycle lanes Allowing southbound vehicles to turn left from the A23 (Purley Way) into Epsom Road and making access to the A232 more direct. This would reduce the amount of traffic using Stafford Road and reduces congestion at the Fiveways Corner junction Epsom Road / Stafford Road junction Banning the left turn from Stafford Road into Epsom Road, providing a simpler junction with realigned pedestrian crossing facilities on the key desire line. This would bring the crossing closer to the station and make it easier for pedestrians to access Waddon Station Improving journey times by allowing for more time for the green signal phase Stafford Road Introducing a new northbound bus lane on Stafford Road, operating from Monday to Saturday between 07.00 and 10.00, and 16.00 and 19.00. Cyclists, motorcyclists, and taxis would be able to use the bus lane Relocating southbound bus stop ‘WB’, served by routes 154 and 157, approximately 60 metres north on Stafford Road, to a new position opposite Fernleigh Close Changing 58 metres of parking bay on the northbound side and 76 metres on the southbound side of Stafford Road to be inset into the footway. This would allow cycles to pass parked cars whilst staying within the bus lanes. Six metres of parking bay on the southbound side would be removed Fiveways Corner To improve the junction for all users, we propose to: Realign Denning Avenue to remove it from the Fiveways Corner junction, re-routeing it to join the A23 opposite the retail park (entrance to Morrisons). This would reduce the number of arms on the junction from five to four, introducing a crossroads arrangement which would simplify the junction and improve road capacity. This would decrease the number of signal phases required at the junction reducing waiting times for traffic on all approaches to the junction Create a new, attractive public space for people to sit and rest at, supporting Croydon Council’s aspirations for Waddon to have a local centre at Fiveways Upgrade all pedestrian crossing facilities to provide signalised controlled facilities at all arms around the junction. Crossings facilitating north-south cycle movements along the A23 would be upgraded to ‘toucan’ cycle friendly crossings. Provide new cycle facilities, including cycle parking, and Advanced Stop Lines. Introduce a left turn lane on Stafford Road (southern arm) for northbound traffic for the A23 to improve capacity at the junction Allow the right turn for southbound traffic on Stafford Road (northern arm) into the northbound A23 Purley Way New and upgraded cycle facilities The scheme would provide for new and enhanced cycle facilities which link in with the existing local cycle network as well as creating a new east-west cycling route through the Fiveways Croydon area. The proposals would provide a safer environment for cycling by introducing the following changes: New 1.5 metre wide cycle lanes in both directions on Epsom Road, to provide a new east-west cycle link from Croydon Road to Duppas Hill Road. The cycle lanes would be ‘stepped’, meaning they would be at a height of approximately 75mm above the road level, and 75mm below the footway New 2 metre wide cycle lanes in both directions on the A23 Purley Way bridge, with segregation at junctions for left turns. This would improve the connection for cyclists and remove the barrier to east-west cycle movement currently formed by the A23 Separate phases for northbound cyclists and left-turning traffic at the junction of A23 Purley Way with Croydon Road New eastbound cycle lane on Croydon Road on the approach to the A23 New advanced stop lines at the junction of Stafford Road with Epsom Road and on Stafford Road at Fiveways Corner Partially inset parking bays on both sides of Stafford Road, to allow cycles to pass parked cars whilst staying within the bus lane. Stafford Road would form part of the new cycle link from Sutton to Croydon town centre Shared pedestrian / cyclist signalised ‘toucan’ crossings at each of the signal-controlled junctions New cycle parking facilities Pedestrian and public space improvements The proposed public space and pedestrian improvements include: Creating new public spaces at Fiveways Corner and on the A23 (Purley Way) Waddon Bridge Creating attractive places for pedestrians to sit and rest Tree-planting and introducing new green spaces Relocating the pedestrian crossing on Epsom Road from its junction with Duppas Hill Road to opposite the Waddon Hotel, to provide more direct access to Waddon Station Introducing signalised pedestrian crossing facilities on A23 Purley Way junctions with A232 Croydon Road, and Epsom Road Signalised crossings on all arms of Fiveways Corner and more direct crossings We are also looking at opportunities to make the following changes to the public spaces in the area: Localised improvements to the general appearance of Stafford Road and Epsom Road Improving lighting, decluttering, and repaving where required Changes to parking and loading To deliver the proposed changes to the road layout, we would need to make the following changes to parking and loading: Removing the parking bays from Epsom Road to accommodate two-way traffic and new cycle lanes Removing six metres of parking bay on the southbound side of Stafford Road and changing the remaining parking bays on both sides to be inset into the pavement Changes to bus services We are proposing to change the location of two existing stops in Fiveways Croydon: Bus stop ‘WB’, served by routes 154 and 157, would be moved approximately 60 metres north on Stafford Road, to a new position opposite Fernleigh Close. Bus stop ‘WD’, served by routes 119 and 663 would be moved to match the new alignment of Denning Avenue Potential impacts of the scheme We cannot deliver all the benefits of the scheme by undertaking work only within the existing highway boundary. Some private property would therefore need to be acquired to undertake the scheme. We are talking to the owners of properties affected by the proposals and we will keep them informed of the progress of the scheme. If you are concerned about the potential impacts of the scheme on your property, please contact us. What changes would there be to traffic flow? Our proposals would result in changes to journey times for road users. Most journey times for motorists and bus passengers are predicted to get shorter or remain similar to that experienced today, whilst a minority are predicted to get longer at busy times. What environmental changes would there be? The proposals would result in some environmental changes in the Fiveways area: Air Quality We expect that the proposed changes would improve air quality in the Waddon area, by reducing traffic congestion, though there are some isolated instances where traffic flows are forecast to increase. To mitigate this impact, we would plant trees and plants where possible. Noise We expect the proposals would have an overall slight negative impact on noise pollution, as a few more sites around Fiveways would be expected to experience an increase, rather than a decrease, in noise levels. The existing noise level experienced by the majority of properties in the area where the A23 and A232 meet is between 60 and 75 decibels – a similar noise level to two people having a conversation, a shower running or vacuum cleaner being operated. Of the few people living or working close to the A23 / A232 intersection who are predicted to experience an increase in noise levels, the majority are expected to experience between three to five decibel increases in noise. A small number of properties will experience an increase above five decibels. We are in discussions with the owners of these properties to agree suitable mitigation measures. Community and built environment Our design team is working to produce a bridge design proposal which blends in and is as aesthetically pleasing as possible. We also propose planting trees alongside the bridge embankments. We are in discussion with residents and property owners to discuss the proposed changes to the bridge alignment and the road layout. We will request an ‘Environmental Screening Opinion’ from Croydon Council’s Planning department in July 2017. The Council is expected to advise whether a full Environmental Impact Assessment and Statement are required with the outcome expected to be known by later this summer. The full Environmental Evaluation Report and supporting evidence will be made available here once it is published. If you do not wish to submit feedback before viewing these documents, please wait until this is available before responding. Tree planting and tree removal The proposed design requires the removal of approximately 50 trees and includes the planting of over 80 new street trees. New rows of trees would also be planted on the proposed embankments along the A23 Purley Way over the railway line west of Waddon Station, and the row of six mature lime trees to the east of this section of the road would be retained. Next steps We will analyse and consider all responses to consultation to help inform our decision on how best to proceed with the proposals. We will also consider other factors, such as the availability of funding and deliverability. We expect to publish the results of the consultation and our planned next steps in late 2017. Should we decide to go ahead with the proposals, we would aim to start construction around summer 2020, with the new highway arrangement operational in autumn 2022.

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  • Nine Elms Lane and Battersea Park Road

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    TfL says: We are seeking your view on our proposals for Nine Elms Lane and Battersea Park Road; developed through dialogue with the Nine Elms Vauxhall Partnership. We propose to transform the 2.5km stretch of road from the Vauxhall Gyratory, along Nine Elms Lane and Battersea Park Road to Macduff Road, connecting to Cycle Superhighway 8 (CS8). Our proposed changes would act as a backbone to the major developments taking place in the area, improving conditions for pedestrians, cyclists, and bus passengers, as well creating a more pleasant and characterful street environment and a sense of destination to the area. Our proposals are being funded through contributions from developers administered by London Borough of Wandsworth. Ahead of these proposals and in response to the ongoing levels of construction in the area, we will implement a small scale, interim scheme during summer 2017 which looks to increase safety in the area and enhance the urban realm. More information on this scheme can be found here. What are we proposing? We are proposing a complete redesign of the road layout on Nine Elms Lane and the eastern part of Battersea Park Road to deliver improvements for pedestrians, cyclists and bus users and accommodate future growth of the area. Proposals include: New, wide footways 23 new and improved signalised crossing points A new cycle route on the south of the Thames from CS8 at Macduff Road to Vauxhall Gyratory, featuring: ‘Stepped’ cycle tracks in both directions (see below) from Vauxhall Gyratory to the new Battersea Power Station London Underground entrance Dedicated segregation and allocated time for cyclists at some junctions Bus stop bypasses provided in some locations Stepped cycle tracks are vertically separated from the footway and main carriageway. Increase in bus lanes to provide reliable journey times to bus passengers Improved junctions by upgrading signals at 5 junctions and providing 3 new signalised junctions Improvements to the street environment, which would see high quality finishes, repaving and new trees planted where possible We would ensure all design and construction is closely coordinated with our plans to transform Vauxhall gyratory. Why are we proposing this? As part of the Mayor’s Opportunity Area Planning Framework, Vauxhall, Nine Elms and Battersea has been identified as an area for major redevelopment. Nine Elms Lane and the eastern part of Battersea Park Road is a major gateway and transport artery for the area. Development is well underway and will be continuing in the coming years, which includes over 40 major developments with new residential and office units, two new town centres at Battersea Power Station and Vauxhall and two new London Underground stations on a new Northern Line Extension, at Nine Elms and Battersea. 20,000 new homes are being built, creating 22,000 construction jobs and a further 25,000 new jobs between now and 2027. Significant improvements are also being made to the public realm, which will include a new 11-acre Nine Elms Park linking Battersea Power Station to Vauxhall Cross. In response to these levels of development and the change in land use, we have been presented with an opportunity to enhance the highway, creating a backbone to the development and a destination where customers are encouraged to walk, cycle and use public transport. The proposals form part of the Mayor of London’s plan for Healthy Streets – a long-term vision to encourage more Londoners to walk and cycle by making London’s streets healthier, safer and more welcoming. We are proposing substantial improvements for pedestrians, cyclists and bus passengers in the area to help encourage more people to use these healthy and sustainable forms of transport. Summary of the proposed changes Cycling facilities New segregated cycle lanes in both directions along most sections of the route. We would make space for these by reallocating space from general traffic and realigning traffic lanes Improvements to safety for cyclists provided through early starts at certain junctions, a cycle only stage at certain junctions, bus stop bypasses and two-stage right turn facilities New signalised junctions at Savona Street and Battersea Park Road, Thessaly Road and Battersea Park Road, and Cringle Street and Nine Elms Lane Ponton Road would see a redesigned junction providing cyclists travelling westbound with a cycle only green stage at the traffic light. Cyclists travelling eastbound, straight across the junction, continuing on Nine Elms Lane would be provided with a bypass lane Cycle only stages would be provided at Kirtling Street and Ponton Road. Road design and layout New signalised junction at Savona Street to incorporate the opening of the new road opposite called Prospect Way New signalised junction at Thessaly Road, subject to outcome of the P5 Bus extension consultation New signalised junction at Cringle Street to manage traffic in and out of the new side road, provide an early start for cyclists and new pedestrian crossing points Banned left turn from Battersea Park Road into Cringle Street for all traffic due to the tight turn Bus facilities Widened bus lanes, where possible to provide passing space for cyclists around buses waiting at stops Around 2km of bus lanes between Vauxhall Gyratory and Prince of Wales Drive, created by removing central islands and realigning traffic lanes Changes to bus lane hours of operation to provide reliable journey times to bus passengers through the area We are separately consulting on a proposed extension to bus route P5 to Battersea Power Station. Please see consultation here. This proposal will be assessed and taken forward separately to the proposed changes for Nine Elms Lane and Battersea Park Road Pedestrian facilities and crossings Where space allows, junctions would have footway buildouts to reduce pedestrian crossing widths and provide additional space for pedestrians The new signalised junction at Savona Street would provide signalised pedestrian facilities on the north, south and west arms of the junction The Kirtling Street junction would see a new signalised pedestrian crossing on the western arm The new Cringle Street junction would see new signalised pedestrian crossings on all arms of the junction A new signalised staggered pedestrian crossing would be provided outside Riverside Court We have used computer analysis to help us ensure our proposals are fit for future growth in pedestrian numbers Journey times for motorists and bus passengers We have carried out traffic modelling analysis to predict how the proposals might affect journey times through the scheme area. A summary of this analysis is available Parking and loading The disabled parking bay outside The Battersea Medical Centre would be extended to 12 metres long to provide 2 parking spaces. It would also be relocated onto the footway All on-street parking bays would have consistent hours of operating, allowing off peak peaking and/or loading Deliveries and servicing We continue to work with businesses and freight operators to minimise the impact of these proposals on their operations. If your home or workplace is on or near the proposed route, please let us know if the proposals could affect your deliveries, collections and servicing. We would encourage you to discuss the proposals with companies undertaking these operations. Environment Our proposals aim to improve the quality of life in the area by: Reducing the dominance of traffic, allowing people to better enjoy the area Increasing provision for active modes - walking and cycling Exploring opportunities and working with developers to achieve more greening Creating a sense of place with the proposed new urban realm high quality finishes which would look to include Sustainable Urban Drainage solutions in our proposals Although we do not expect an increase to the number of motor vehicles in the area, our proposals may change how traffic moves around some roads, which may result in some associated and localised changes to air quality and noise levels. Environmental surveys and modelling would take place as part of our ongoing evaluation of these proposals. Equalities In considering the design of our streets, we closely consider the needs of all users throughout the design process. On significant infrastructure projects, we: Complete Equality Impact Assessments (EIA) at the outset of the project, to review potential impacts on equality target groups, including disabled people Carry out public consultations, including targeted engagement with specific users such as (amongst many others): Royal National Institute of Blind People, Guide Dogs for the Blind, Age Concern, Transport for All, and the National Autistic Society Ensure we comply with established guidance – such as the Design Manual for Roads and Bridges – which includes detailed requirements for disabled people The EIA for Nine Elms Lane and Battersea Park Road will continue to be developed following the outcome of this public consultation, incorporating feedback received. Next steps We will analyse and consider all of the responses received to the consultation, and publish our response later this year. Construction of the scheme would be subject to the outcome of this consultation, and further approvals. Should we decide to go ahead, we would aim to start construction in 2020/2021.

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  • Waterloo roundabout

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    We want your views on proposals to help inform our LCC response. TfL says: Overview: We want your views on our proposals to create a better Waterloo. We’ve developed these proposals over the past 10 years by working with local stakeholders and the community. The original vision can be found here. Our proposals aim to create a healthier and safer environment for people to walk and cycle and use public transport as well as support the regeneration and growth of Waterloo. These proposals aim to improve the quality of life in the area by: Reducing the dominance of traffic, allowing people to better enjoy the area Creating a healthier and safer environment Planting more trees to replace the removal of trees which will have the potential to benefit biodiversity, landscaping and wildlife Creating a sense of place with the proposed new public square Creating a focal point for Waterloo, helping build on it as a cultural destination and support the regeneration and growth of Waterloo Keeping buses and traffic moving through the area. The proposals form part of the Mayor of London’s plan for Healthy Streets - a long-term vision to encourage more Londoners to walk and cycle and use public transport by making London’s streets healthier, safer and more welcoming. What we are proposing Our proposals would: Create a new tree-filled public square supporting civic and cultural life of the area by moving the existing bus stops from Tenison Way to an improved bus station on Waterloo Road, closing the south-west arm of the roundabout and changing the remaining carriageway to two-way traffic Introduce segregated cycle lanes making cycling around Waterloo roundabout safer Create new pedestrian routes and permanently remove some subways (but keep others) to help create more direct walking routes towards the river Thames. The subways can be unpleasant and divisive, inaccessible to large sections of the community Widen the footways on Waterloo Road to give more space to pedestrians and waiting bus passengers by narrowing the carriageway through removing a section of bus lane Relocate northbound and southbound bus stops to keep traffic moving on Waterloo Road Ban the right turns from Waterloo Road into Stamford Street and from Concert Hall Approach (except for buses) to keep traffic moving. Why We Are Consulting Encourage more walking and cycling and use of buses by Making it easier, safer and more pleasant Keeping buses and traffic moving through the area Provide a sense of place and improve the environment by Creating a new, high-quality, traffic-free, green public space to become a focal point for Waterloo supporting the civic and cultural life of the area Support the regeneration and growth of Waterloo Currently the area is overcrowded and difficult to navigate for pedestrians, bus passengers and cyclists. This is exacerbated by street clutter and level differences that make it confusing and harder for people to get to where they want to go. It will get even busier because of major planned developments, including increasing capacity at Waterloo station. The roundabout is dominated by motor traffic and can be intimidating and unpleasant to walk and cycle. By giving cyclists more space and time to pass through the area more easily, and by providing new signalised crossings, a new public space and wider footways for pedestrians and waiting bus passengers, we can encourage more people to use these healthy and sustainable forms of transport, whilst keeping other traffic moving. Waterloo is a very important transport hub with Europe’s busiest rail station, a strategic bus interchange, and large numbers of cyclists and some key cycle routes passing through it. It is also home to international visitor and cultural attractions, workplaces, residents and academic institutions. Our proposals are designed to improve safety for vulnerable road users by introducing dedicated facilities, such as signalised pedestrian crossings, new cycle lanes and separate cycle signals. Waterloo roundabout is one of 33 locations across London we are prioritising as part of our Safer Junctions programme. Overall, these proposals are designed to make it easier, safer and more attractive to walk, cycle and use public transport in the area, and to prepare for and stimulate further growth and regeneration. Potential effects of our proposals Journey times We expect the proposals would result in changes, both positive and negative, to journey times for motorists, bus passengers and cyclists once complete. Click here for the information (PDF) that explains the impacts we expect our proposals to have on journey times and is accompanied by a more detailed table of data. Walking We want to make walking more convenient and attractive. There are a number of places where overcrowding is common such as Tenison Way and Waterloo Road: The proposed new public space would provide lots more room for pedestrians and create a key focal point in the local area with crossings relocated to where people want to cross Wider and clearer footways would reduce overcrowding on Waterloo Road Walking routes would be opened up, improving way finding and permeability. Cycling Taken from survey data in 2013 cyclists make-up 40% of traffic around Waterloo roundabout in the AM peak. We want to make cycling in Waterloo easier, safer and more attractive. Our proposals provide dedicated time and space for cyclists and aim to reduce road casualties by addressing the patterns of past collisions: Segregated cycle lanes around the new peninsula. The impact of this is balanced with bus and general traffic movements by making some strutural changes to the roundabout Separate cycle signals on traffic lights would reduce the number of conflicts with general traffic Existing cycle parking stands would be relocated The cycle hire docking station outside Kings College would be relocated We are working with other teams delivering projects that would provide better and safer connections to existing and planned cycle routes. Bus passengers Waterloo is a strategic part of the London bus network, with some of its busiest routes serving the area, used by 20,000 passengers a day. Our proposals aim to encourage more people onto buses and keep all traffic moving: An improved bus station and new public square would provide a much improved interchange and waiting environment for bus passengers Wider footways on Waterloo Road would provide a larger and safer area for waiting bus passengers and accommodate future growth in numbers Bus stops would be relocated from Tenison Way to the improved bus station on Waterloo Road and the northbound and southbound bus stops on Waterloo Road would be consolidated. A short section of bus lane on Waterloo Road would be removed to keep traffic moving. General traffic We want to reduce the dominance of traffic around Waterloo by creating an environment which encourages people to walk, cycle or use public transport. As a result: There would be some changes to general traffic journey times as a result of these proposals. We would remove the south-western side of the roundabout to create the new public space. Traffic would flow two-way around the new peninsula The section of northbound bus lane on Waterloo Road from the junction with The Cut would be removed to provide more space for pedestrians. Buses would share the general traffic lane and pull-in to the relocated bus stops allowing traffic to pass The right turn from Waterloo Road into Stamford Street and the right turn from Concert Hall Approach (except for buses) would be banned to keep traffic moving through the area. We do not develop proposals to introduce traffic restrictions without carefully considering the potential impacts and exploring alternative solutions. The restrictions are proposed to either address a safety issue, or help the signalised junction operate more efficiently and minimise potential journey time delays to road users. Deliveries and servicing Some changes to existing servicing arrangements may be required. If your home or workplace is on or near the proposed changes, please let us know if the proposals could affect your deliveries, collections and servicing. We would encourage you to discuss the proposals with companies undertaking these operations. Taxis The main taxi rank is on Station Approach and is not affected by these proposals. Rail and London Underground users Network Rail has a programme of works to increase capacity at Waterloo Station and London Underground has plans to increase Bakerloo and Northern Line services, increasing the numbers of people using Waterloo to interchange. Our proposals would make it easier and more attractive for passengers to continue their journeys on foot, cycle or bus. Environment Air pollution is one of the most significant challenges facing London, affecting the health of all Londoners. As part of the plans for new measures to tackle London’s current poor air quality, we have been consulting on proposals to bring forward the introduction of the London Ultra Low Emission Zone (ULEZ). A number of other schemes to improve London’s air quality are planned, including taking steps to reduce air pollution from our bus fleet, reducing emissions from taxis and private hire vehicles, setting up five ‘Low Emission Neighbourhoods’ and expanding the electric vehicle charging network, as well as making it simpler to use. We are investing to make London’s streets healthy, safe and attractive places to walk and cycle. Enabling more journeys to be made on foot or by bike can help reduce private vehicle use and associated emissions. Click here for more information on how we are creating Healthy Streets and click here for the draft Mayor's Transport Strategy. Our proposals aim to improve the quality of life in the area by: Reducing the dominance of traffic, allowing people to better enjoy the area Exploring opportunities to achieve more greening Creating a sense of place with the proposed new public square and providing additional seating. As our proposals for Waterloo would change how traffic moves around the area, we expect there would be some associated and localised changes to air quality and noise levels. We will be carrying-out environmental surveys and environmental modelling to help our design development. Security barriers on Waterloo Bridge The Metropolitan Police Service has installed barriers to increase security on London’s busiest bridges. Our proposals will aim to ensure that the security of all road users is maintained in the future. Working with the local community TfL has been working with Lambeth Council and engaging with businesses, local stakeholders and the Mayor to develop these proposals over the years. These are the planning documents and guidance consulted on with the local community that have helped us develop these proposals: A local college, Morley College, has produced a photo record to capture the sense of place and character of the area that these proposals will build on. These photos will be on show at the public events and around Waterloo. There is a public art poem by the poet Sue Hubbard called “Eurydice” on the wall of one the subways we propose to remove. The poem was written as part of the renovation of the South Bank especially for the underpass that leads from Victory Arch at Waterloo Station to the BFI IMAX cinema. We will work with local stakeholders to investigate how we can include the poem in the new public space. Next steps Subject to the outcome of this consultation, should we proceed with these proposals, we would look to start construction in late 2019 for a period of up to 18 months. We are aware that there is a lot of construction occurring in the Waterloo area and these changes are likely to cause further disruption. We would work with the local community, Lambeth Council, SBEG, WeAreWaterloo and surrounding developers to coordinate works and deliveries to minimise this impact as far as possible. Previous consultations As part of the Mayor’s Better Junctions Review we made improvements at the roundabout to reduce accidents by providing more priority and road space for cyclists, particularly at the junctions with Stamford Street and Waterloo Road. Later the speed limit was reduced to 20mph and will be retained under these proposals.

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  • Lambeth Bridge North & South

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    TfL says: Overview: We have developed proposals to transform the road layout at the northern and southern roundabouts at Lambeth Bridge to create a safer environment for cycling and walking. We would also make changes to some approach roads and to the bridge itself. Focussing on road safety, our proposals are designed to keep traffic moving along these key routes, whilst providing a better balance to the way that space on the road is allocated. Our proposals would require changes to the way general traffic moves through the area, including new left or right turn traffic restrictions on some roads at each end of the bridge. What are we proposing? We propose to convert both the northern and the southern roundabouts of Lambeth Bridge into crossroad junctions, with traffic signals and signalised pedestrian crossings. At each junction, dedicated space would be given for cyclists and new pedestrian areas would be created. To support these transformational plans, changes to the road layout are also proposed on Lambeth Bridge itself, at the Millbank north junction with Great Peter Street and along Lambeth Palace Road. These layout changes include two general traffic lanes at each exit from the bridge, the introduction of a signalised pedestrian crossing at the Millbank north junction with Great Peter Street, and the extension of the southbound bus lane on Lambeth Palace Road. We have also developed public realm improvements, sensitive to the heritage of the area. These designs propose to further enhance the look and feel of the area so that we can promote a real sense of place to Lambeth Bridge and its surrounds. The Metropolitan Police Service has installed barriers to increase security on London’s busiest bridges. Our proposals will aim to ensure that the security of all road users is maintained in the future. We are also seeking views on: Longer-term plans for the pedestrian underpass at Albert Embankment A potential new location for the palm tree at Lambeth Bridge north The current traffic speed at Lambeth Bridge north and south Why are we proposing it? Safety Our proposals are designed to improve safety at both northern and southern roundabouts by introducing dedicated facilities for vulnerable road users, such as signalised pedestrian crossings, new cycle lanes and separate cycle signals. The northern roundabout in particular has a high proportion of collisions involving cyclists, and is one of 33 locations across London we are prioritising as part of our Safer Junctions programme. Healthy Streets to encourage walking and cycling The proposals form part of the Mayor of London’s long-term vision to encourage more Londoners to walk and cycle by making London’s streets healthier, safer and more welcoming. Both roundabouts and Lambeth Bridge are currently dominated by motor traffic and can be intimidating and unpleasant places to walk and cycle. By giving cyclists space and time to pass through the junction more easily, and by providing new signalised crossings and clearer footways for pedestrians, we can encourage more people to use these healthy and sustainable forms of transport, whilst keeping other traffic moving. Building a local cycle network Lambeth Bridge and its roundabouts lie on busy cycle commuter routes. Making the area safer and more welcoming for cyclists would help build connections to existing infrastructure, such as Cycle Superhighway Route 8 on Millbank, and planned improvements, such as Westminster Bridge and Central London Grid routes. The following map shows how our proposals would build on cycling connectivity in the area. The impacts of our proposals Journey times Our proposals have been designed to not have a disproportionate impact on other road users. However we expect there would be changes, both positive and negative, to journey times for motorists, bus passengers and cyclists. More detailed information on the traffic impacts of the Lambeth Bridge proposals, including tables of the likely journey time impacts, can be found here https://consultations.tfl.gov.uk/roads/lambeth-bridge/user_uploads/traffic-impacts-and-data-table.pdf Should these proposals go ahead, we would take a number of steps to ensure that the changes made along the route are balanced. We are investing in advanced traffic signal technology to allow us to better manage traffic depending on differing conditions at any given time. Turning restrictions Our proposals include a number of restrictions to turning movements: ‘Straight-ahead only’ for traffic exiting Millbank north A time-of-day banned right-turn from Millbank south onto Lambeth Bridge during the evening peak A banned left-turn for northbound traffic from Millbank south into Horseferry Road ‘Straight-ahead only’ for traffic exiting Horseferry Road A banned left-turn from Lambeth Palace Road onto Lambeth Road. A banned right-turn from Lambeth Road onto Lambeth Palace Road. We do not develop proposals to introduce traffic restrictions without carefully considering the potential impacts and exploring alternative solutions. The restrictions are proposed either to address a safety issue or to help the signalised junction operate more efficiently, minimising potential journey time delays to road users. The environment Air and noise Although the designs for Lambeth Bridge north and south are not expected to increase the number of motor vehicles in the area, our proposals may change how traffic moves around some roads, which may result in some associated and localised changes to air quality and noise levels. Environmental surveys and modelling would take place as part of our ongoing evaluation of these proposals. Tree removal Our proposals require the removal or relocation of a number of trees in order to accommodate the new road layout: The iconic phoenix palm tree at the centre of the roundabout on the northern side of Lambeth Bridge would look to be relocated Seven trees at the centre of the roundabout on the southern side of Lambeth Bridge would need to be removed One tree at the junction of Millbank and Great Peter Street would need to be removed New trees will be planted at Lambeth Bridge north and south as part of proposed urban realm improvements. Subject to the outcome of consultation, tree species would be determined during detailed design. Visual environment Our proposed urban realm improvements aim to improve the look and feel of the area, as shown in our artists’ impressions. Features include: Reducing the dominance of traffic, allowing pedestrians and cyclists to better enjoy the area Increasing the surface area of the public realm by approximately 1,370 square metres at Lambeth Bridge north and approximately 1,790 square metres at Lambeth Bridge south Attracting more visitors to the area and local attractions such as Victoria Tower Gardens Planting new trees bringing overall benefits for the area’s biodiversity and landscape Providing new seating New footway materials to improve the look of the streets along Albert Embankment, Lambeth Palace Road, Millbank and Lambeth Bridge The removal of unnecessary and duplicate poles, signs and other street furniture Upgrades where necessary to existing lighting and drainage Provision of more cycle parking An opportunity to provide additional Cycle Hire stations Upgraded wayfinding for example to Newport Street Gallery Equalities In considering the design of our streets, we closely consider the needs of all users throughout the design process. On significant infrastructure projects, we: Complete Equality Impact Assessments (EqIA), to review potential impacts on equality target groups, including disabled people Carry out public consultations, including targeted engagement with specific users such as (amongst many others): Royal National Institute of Blind People, Guide Dogs for the Blind, Age Concern, Transport for All, and the National Autistic Society Ensure we comply with established guidance – such as the Design Manual for Roads and Bridges – which includes detailed requirements for disabled people The EqIA for Lambeth Bridge north and south will continue to be developed following the outcome of this public consultation, incorporating feedback received. Other options considered but not taken forward We considered a number of alternative designs before taking forward our current proposals. At Lambeth Bridge south, we considered retaining the roundabout, but this provided minimal benefits for cyclists. We also considered ‘hold the left’ turn facilities on Lambeth Road and Lambeth Bridge, which separate cyclists from other traffic with separate traffic signals. However this scenario would have caused significant traffic queueing due to the extra signal phase required and was difficult to accommodate due to the structure of the bridge. We also considered a number of designs at Lambeth Bridge north including a signalised junction and a ‘Dutch style’ roundabout with a physically separated cycle track around the edge of the roundabout. However, our modelling indicated that this would have had significant impact on journey times for other road users in the area, including thousands of bus passengers. Having considered a number of designs, we believe the current proposals would achieve the best balance for all road users. Related schemes Lambeth north interim scheme During March 2017, we delivered interim safety improvements at Lambeth Bridge northern roundabout. The changes were timed to bring improvements whilst we continued with plans to re-work the junction's layout for the long-term. Next steps Subject to the outcome of this consultation, should we proceed with these proposals, we would look to start construction in late 2018. Although construction would cause some disruption, we would take steps to minimise this as far as possible. Building in late 2018 would allow us to coordinate with major planned maintenance work on Lambeth Bridge, and with work currently taking place at Westminster Bridge South.

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  • Stratford Town Centre

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    Newham council say: We are working with Transport for London to transform Stratford town centre. This will include introducing two-way traffic around the Stratford Centre, improving bus services, and providing better facilities for pedestrians and cyclists. Changes to the one-way traffic system will allow for a better flow of traffic and reduce accidents in the area. It will also create a safer and more attractive town centre for everyone to enjoy. Our plans aim to encourage more people to visit the Broadway, High Street and Cultural Quarter and support our local businesses and cultural venues. As part of the plans, we want to: - introduce a two-way traffic ​system and road calming measures to reduce speeds - create separate cycle tracks to encourage more people to cycle through Stratford - widen the pedestrian crossing at Meridian Square and move other crossings to locations where pedestrians prefer to cross - improve the appearance of streets by resurfacing pavements, removing old street furniture and introducing new landscaping - enhance the public area near Theatre Square and St John’s Church.

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  • New dedicated cycle lanes at Hammersmith gyratory

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    TfL overview We are proposing a number of changes at Hammersmith gyratory, King Street, Beadon Road and Hammersmith Road as part of our Road Modernisation Plan, in partnership with Hammersmith & Fulham Council (H&F Council).The proposals aim to deliver a safer and more direct east-west cycle route through Hammersmith town centre. What are we proposing? We are proposing to create a direct, kerb-segregated two-way route for cyclists across the northern side of the gyratory, with separate cycle signals to protect them from traffic. This would remove the need to cycle round the gyratory, mixing with fast-moving traffic, and break a key barrier to cycling in west London. To improve conditions and safety for cyclists we would: - Provide a segregated two-way cycle track on the north side of Hammersmith gyratory. Cyclists would be physically separated from traffic by a kerb. We would make room for the cycle track by reallocating space from some sections of the wide pavement on the south side of the road - Separate cyclist and motor vehicle movements at junctions; cyclists would have their own traffic signals which would be green at different times to those for motor traffic - Extend the eastbound contraflow cycle track on King Street to allow cyclists to reach the gyratory from Hammersmith Town Hall without having to follow Studland Street, Glenthorne Road and Beadon Road. The cycle track would be ‘stepped’, meaning it would be at a height between the road and footway, and become physically separated with a kerb east of Lyric Square. We would make room for the cycle track by reallocating some space from the pavement on the south side of King Street - Provide a short two-way section of cycle track on Queen Caroline Street to allow access to Black’s Road and Hammersmith Bridge Road - Enable cyclists to pass through the island at the junction of Hammersmith Broadway and Butterwick, and increase the size of the island to accommodate cyclists and pedestrians We would also make the following changes in the area: - Provide a new bus lane on Beadon Road, between Glenthorne Road and Hammersmith Broadway - Remove the pedestrian crossing between the south side of Hammersmith Broadway and Shepherd’s Bush Road to allow for provision of the segregated cycle track - Install pedestrian countdown signals at the crossings of King Street, Beadon Road, Shepherd’s Bush Road, Queen Caroline Street, Hammersmith Broadway and Butterwick - Widen the footway on King Street where possible to provide more space for pedestrians in this busy area - Raise the carriageway to footway level on King Street opposite Lyric Square to make crossing more convenient for pedestrians and encourage slower motor vehicle speed - De-clutter pavements by rationalising locations of street furniture - Increased cycle parking - Relocate one loading bay and two disabled parking bays on Black’s Road to provide space for additional taxi rank spaces Why are we proposing this? TfL is investing £4bn in the Capital’s vital road network to ensure London’s roads are able to meet the needs of a growing population. As part of this plan, we are reviewing junctions and gyratories across London to make them safer for all road users, including cyclists, and to make journey times more reliable. Hammersmith gyratory is used by many cyclists each day, and can be an intimidating place to cycle. Hammersmith is one of the Mayor of London’s 33 priority “Better Junctions”. H&F Council’s cycling strategy sets out an ambitious plan to increase the number of people cycling in the borough to reach eight per cent of all journeys. Part of this plan is to deliver a segregated cycle route along the A315 corridor, a key commuter route for cyclists. Hammersmith gyratory lies on this route. We are proposing to give cyclists dedicated space and separate cycle signals at junctions on the northern side of the gyratory. This would offer cyclists a more comfortable and direct route between King Street and Hammersmith Road, bridging the gap in the proposed A315 cycling route that the gyratory currently creates. Removal of the pedestrian crossing To ensure cyclists have adequate space to wait for a green signal on the island at the south of Shepherd’s Bush Road, we would need to remove the existing pedestrian crossing that connects this island to the south side of Hammersmith Broadway. Although the crossing is less well-used than others in the area, its removal would mean pedestrians would have to find alternative routes. Those walking between the south side of Hammersmith Broadway and the west side of Shepherd’s Bush Road would need to cross Queen Caroline Street and Beadon Road. Those walking between the south side of Hammersmith Broadway and the east side of Shepherd’s Bush Road would have a choice between crossing Queen Caroline Street, Beadon Road and Shepherd’s Bush Road or crossing Hammersmith Broadway at its junction with Butterwick. The vast majority of pedestrians crossing Hammersmith Broadway from outside the Piccadilly Line tube station use the most western of the two crossings. Impact on buses Beadon Road is narrow and carries a high volume of buses and general traffic. To reduce delays currently experienced by buses approaching the gyratory, we would provide a new bus lane on Beadon Road between Glenthorne Road and Hammersmith Broadway, replacing one of the two general traffic lanes. We also would need to relocate bus stop Z5 on the gyratory, which is currently used for emergency purposes only, to Butterwick. How would bus and traffic journey times be affected? Our proposals would affect some journey times through the area. In the main these changes would not be significant, with some bus and general traffic journeys getting shorter and some getting longer. The most notable increases in journey times will be for traffic approaching Hammersmith gyratory from Fulham Palace Road in the morning and evening peaks. Impact on other road users We propose to relocate the position of one loading bay on Shepherd’s Bush Road, with the existing dimensions remaining, in order to allow for an increase in the size of the existing taxi rank. How does this fit in with the wider plans for Hammersmith town centre? TfL and H&F Council are working together on ambitious plans for a long-term transformation of Hammersmith town centre. We are proposing shorter-term improvements to improve safety and connectivity for existing cyclists and support the Council’s cycling strategy to increase the number of new cyclists in the area. This plan is separate to, and does not affect longer term proposals for the area, however these proposals would be integrated with any future schemes. Delivery of the wider A315 cycling improvements TfL and H&F Council are also working together on plans for an east-west cycling route along the A315. Plans for this route either side of Hammersmith gyratory are currently being developed, with public consultation planned to take place later this year.

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  • King Cross Gyratory Redesign

    Created by Tom Harrison // 1 thread

    Issue now superseded by this issue discussing TfL's consultation: http://www.cyclescape.org/issues/2040-changes-to-the-king-s-cross-gyratory TfL, Camden Council, and Islington Council are currently developing plans to redesign the Kings Cross Gyratory and address some of the failures of the current gyratory layout. The current environment is very poor, and a real barrier to cycling. Fast, and congested one way traffic with 10-20,000 PCUs per day, and no cycle provision currently. Accessing the station from the east is almost impossible. The area has seen a number of cycle collisions including at least one fatality. To pre-empt the consultation due late 2015, we wanted to discuss what would be the best outcome for people on bikes. More information will be added when we know more, but for now, ideas please.

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  • Wandsworth Gyratory - TfL scheme with zero cycle lanes!

    Created by CycleSi // 2 threads

    TfL are undertaking major junction improvements at several gyratory systems. All of them include protected cycle lanes/tracks, except Wandsworth! The local London Cycle Campaign group is not campaigning and virtually defunct. We desperately need to organise local cyclists and campaigners all over London and beyond to challenge this bizarre scheme. Oval, Vauxhall, Elephant & Castle, Stockwell, Archway, Aldgate, etc, etc are all getting extensive safe space for cycling. TfL for some reason (I suspect the blame lies with the borough) have instead decided to claim that the awful shared footpaths and streets with no cycling infrastructure at all that have been designated as 'cycle routes' form part of a 'cycle network'. They are even planning to have Cycle Superhighway 8 run along Wandsworth High Street with not even a painted cycle lane - cyclists will be mixed in with extremely heavy bus traffic. It seems like no-one is talking about this other than me!! Seriously-argh!!!! Suggestions, ideas, offers to help campaign all welcome.

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  • TfL Consultation: Further safety improvements at Bow roundabout

    Created by Shaun McDonald // 1 thread

    Further safety improvements at Bow roundabout Overview Transport for London (TfL) is working with interested parties - including cycling, road user and safety organisations - to review and improve cycling provision at junctions. Why We Are Consulting As part of this work, we have developed proposals to further improve safety at Bow roundabout. What we’re proposing and why Bow roundabout is a key junction for cyclists travelling between central and east London. Cycle Early Start A cycle early-start would operate at the traffic signals on the westbound approach to Bow roundabout. This would provide a dedicated green light to allow cyclists to wait ahead of other traffic before moving onto the roundabout. A new mandatory cycle lane on the westbound approach would allow cyclists to get to the roundabout entrance without having to filter through traffic. The early-start area would be 18 metres deep, so there's a clear space for cyclists in front of any traffic. This cycle early-start would improve safety, due to the reduced risk of conflict between cyclists travelling straight ahead and vehicles turning left. It would also provide a quick and direct route through the roundabout for cyclists. The eastbound early-start was completed in June 2012. Our provisional monitoring to date shows that the eastbound early-start has been effective in reducing the left turning conflict risk that it was designed to address. It also shows that the cycle lane on the approach is well-used, with significantly fewer cyclists using the footway than before. We will continue to monitor and analyse the operation of these facilities. Cycle Bus Stop By-Pass TfL is proposing to introduce a new cycle lane around the back of the bus stop on the approach to the roundabout to help cyclists get ahead of other traffic and reduce the risk of conflict between cyclists and buses pulling in and out of the bus stop. To accommodate the new cycle lane, the bus lay by would be filled in so buses would stop on the carriageway instead. . Please click here to see the map for further information on the proposals. We continue to explore further improvements for cyclists and pedestrians as part of planned longer-term regeneration of the Bow area. We intend to begin work at the roundabout in January 2013. We’ll write to residents and businesses nearer the time to advise on the timing and impact of construction work. https://consultations.tfl.gov.uk/betterjunctions/bow_roundabout/consult_view

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  • TfL Consultation: Battersea Park Road and Havelock Terrace

    Created by Shaun McDonald // 1 thread

    Overview Transport for London (TfL) is working with interested parties - including cycling, road user and safety organisations - to review and improve cycling provision at junctions. As part of this work, we have developed proposals for further safety improvements at the junction of Battersea Park Road and Havelock Terrace. This follows the introduction of a new signalised pedestrian crossing and cyclist Advanced Stop Line at the junction in June 2012. Why We Are Consulting About the proposed changes: Our review of the current junction layout showed that the two narrow general traffic lanes on Battersea Park Road southbound mean that cyclists are sometimes squeezed towards the kerb by motorists. It also identified conflict between cyclists and motorists merging across lanes when approaching the junction southbound from Battersea Park Road. Our proposed improvements have been designed to address the above issues. They include: A new central cycle lane to help cyclists turning right from Battersea Park Road into Prince of Wales Drive. This would mean two lanes of traffic on the southbound approach from Battersea Park Road instead of three. These proposals may mean a slight increase in journey times at busy periods. One wider southbound general traffic lane on the Battersea Park Road exit instead of two narrow ones. This would reduce the likelihood of cyclists being squeezed against the kerb by motorists A new traffic island at the junction of Prince of Wales Drive to segregate westbound cyclists and motorists New sections of eastbound and westbound mandatory cycle lane on Prince of Wales Drive to provide more space for cyclists. The eastbound cycle lane would replace one of the general traffic lanes on the approach to the junction Widening the existing mandatory cycle lane on Battersea Park Road (northbound) to provide more space for cyclists Removing the existing yellow box marking from the junction, as the proposed new lane layout would mean it was no longer needed. Please click here to see the attached map for further information on our proposals. We plan to start work in late December 2012. How to comment on the proposals: Please let us know your views completing the online consultation form below by 30 November 2012. About the Better Junctions programme: TfL is making it easier and safer for people to cycle in London. As part of this work, we’re meeting with a number of different organisations to review and improve junctions on the Barclays Cycle Superhighways and the Transport for London Road Network (TLRN). We’re planning a variety of improvements, ranging from initial upgrades at some locations, to more substantial and innovative redevelopment at others. Please see www.tfl.gov.uk/betterjunctions for more information. https://consultations.tfl.gov.uk/betterjunctions/battersea-park

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  • TfL Consultation: Initial safety improvements at Waterloo (IMAX) roundabout

    Created by Shaun McDonald // 1 thread

    Overview Transport for London (TfL) is working with interested parties - including cycling and road safety organisations - to review and improve cycling provision at major junctions across London. Please see www.tfl.gov.uk/betterjunctions for more information. Why We Are Consulting As part of this work we have developed proposals to improve safety at the Waterloo (IMAX) roundabout at the junctions of Waterloo Road, Stamford Street, York Road and Concert Hall Approach. What we’re proposing and why Waterloo roundabout is a key junction for cyclists travelling between central and south London. Counts show that more than 5,500 cyclists use Waterloo roundabout each weekday, representing nearly a quarter of all traffic here. Our review of the current road layout identified that early improvements can be made to allow cyclists better access to Advanced Stop Lines (ASLs) on the roundabout, reducing the need for them to position themselves amongst fast-moving traffic. We’re proposing the following improvements: New cycle feeder lanes leading into new longer ASLs will reduce the risk of collisions by helping cyclists to get ahead of other traffic. The new feeder lanes will mean that some sections of the roundabout will have three lanes for all traffic instead of four Extending footways and traffic islands to reduce traffic speeds and provide more space for pedestrians. Traffic modelling suggests that these changes would cause some increase in queuing on the roundabout and approaches at busy times, particularly on the approach from Stamford Street. Proposed 20mph speed limit to follow in 2013 We are also proposing a 20mph speed limit at the roundabout. This would be introduced early in 2013. We will provide more information once these proposals have been developed further. Please click here to see the map for further information on the proposals. We are continuing to explore further improvements for cyclists and pedestrians as part of planned longer-term regeneration of the Waterloo area. We intend to begin work at the roundabout on 21 November 2012. We will write to residents and businesses nearer the time to advise on the timing and impact of construction work. Have your say Please give us your views by completing the online consultation form by 14 November 2012. https://consultations.tfl.gov.uk/betterjunctions/waterloo-roundabout

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  • TfL Consultation: Proposed improvements at the junction of Mile End Road and Burdett Road

    Created by Shaun McDonald // 1 thread

    Overview Transport for London (TfL) is working with interested parties - including cycling, road user and safety organisations - to review and improve cycling provision at junctions. As part of this work, we have developed proposals to improve conditions for pedestrians and cyclists at the junction of Mile End Road and Burdett Road. Why We Are Consulting About the proposed changes: Our review of the current junction layout showed that there is an above average level of collisions involving pedestrians and cyclists coming into conflict with turning vehicles. The proposed improvements are shown on the attached plan and include: Removal of the slip roads to reduce the potential for conflict between vehicles and cyclists. Reducing crossing distances and number of crossings for pedestrians New mandatory cycle lanes on Mile End Road and Grove Road to allow cyclists easier access to the advanced stop line. Increased cycle parking around the junction. Wider traffic islands, new trees and levelled footways. New street lighting system to be combined with traffic signals to create more space on the footways. To incorporate the above benefits, we will also need to change the traffic lights operation to allow vehicles to exit Grove Road and Burdett Road at the same time. Please click here to view the map for further information on our proposals. We plan to begin works in early 2013. How to comment on the proposals: Please give us your views by completing the online consultation form below. You can also contact TfL’s Consultation Team at: STengagement@tfl.gov.uk. Please let us know your views by 10 December 2012 About the Better Junctions programme: TfL is making it easier and safer for people to cycle in London. As part of this work, we’re meeting with a number of different organisations to review and improve junctions on the Barclays Cycle Superhighways and the Transport for London Road Network (TLRN). We’re planning a variety of improvements, ranging from initial upgrades at some locations, to more substantial and innovative redevelopment at others. Please see www.tfl.gov.uk/betterjunctions for more information. https://consultations.tfl.gov.uk/betterjunctions/mileendburdett

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  • TfL Consultation: Proposed banned left turn from Tower Bridge Road into Abbey Street

    Created by Shaun McDonald // 1 thread

    Overview Transport for London (TfL) is working with interested parties - including cycling and road safety organisations - to review and improve cycling provision at major junctions across London. Please see www.tfl.gov.uk/betterjunctions for more information. Why We Are Consulting As part of this work we are developing proposals to improve safety at the junction of Tower Bridge Road and Abbey Street. What we’re proposing and why We are proposing to ban the left turn from Tower Bridge Road into Abbey Street to reduce the potential for conflict between cyclists and left-turning vehicles. Traffic counts show that fewer than 4 vehicles per hour make this turn at peak time. We intend to ban the left turn towards the end of December 2012 and will advertise the changes to the Traffic Order in November. Other planned changes at the Tower Bridge Road/Abbey Street junction We are also developing proposals for more substantial improvements for cyclists and pedestrians at this junction, including improved pedestrian crossing facilities. More information will be available early next year, once these proposals have been developed further. Earlier this year we marked-out Advanced Stop Lines (ASLs) in green and put blind spot safety mirrors on the signals at the junction so cyclists are more visible to vehicles turning. Please click here to view map for further information on the proposals. Have your say Please give us your views by completing the online consultation form below by 14 November 2012. https://consultations.tfl.gov.uk/betterjunctions/tower-bridge-abbeyst

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