Things tagged 'cycleway'

48 issues found for 'cycleway':

  • 2-way Cycle Tracks - do cyclists use them in the contraflow direction?

    Created by Bruce Lynn // 2 threads

    Observations on the recently opened Cycleway 4 in South London indicate that 25% of cyclists choose NOT to use it in the contraflow direction. This is consistent with the view of many cyclists that it is better to be on the "correct" side of the road.  A short report of the counts on CW4 is at

    https://drive.google.com/file/d/1RONkTFVNwjOZgjpeTdxw_W06R08d9h9_/view?usp=sharing

    I would be interested if anyone else has similar findings. and in general how people feel about 2-way tracks.  TfL seem to like them (use a bit less space, a little cheaper). But if they are significantly less likely to be used than two 1-way tracks, this information might get us better designs.

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  • Strikes Crossing

    Created by MJR // 1 thread

    The former level crossing near a petrol station and the Strikes bowling alley is a frequent source of conflict between cycling and motoring. As of 2020, this is a toucan crossing just west of the former railway's line, necessitating cyclists to slalom across it. There are short cycleways on the south side of the A148 Lynn Road and Gaywood Road providing access to the main entrance of King Edward School.

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  • Missing section of cycleway

    Created by MJR // 0 threads

    The Hardwick Road cycleway abruptly terminates at the corner of Beech Road, within sight of the next section at South Gates roundabout. Cyclists wishing to continue towards town without being obstructed by motorists need to either use six beg-button crossings of the A149 Hardwick Road to cross over and back, or use four beg-button crossings to head towards Hardings Way (where another three beg-buttons and currently a dismount greets them), or they can illegally slalom contraflow through a parking bay, footway and oncoming traffic - and unsurprisingly many do the latter.

    All of the houses by the parking bay blocking the way have their own drives and it is not that much used. It could be repainted as a two-way cycleway, protected with posts and the slopes into the ends made shallower.

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  • Dangerous Cycleway

    Created by MJR // 0 threads

    A cycleway was built alongside Scania Way, but it is dangerous in many ways, including:

    • The north end is on the corner of a busy T-junction with HGVs turning. The cycleway was originally planned to turn north onto Oldmedow Road as cycle lanes but the "safety auditors" refused to allow that and instead insisted on this dangerous ending!
    • Some of the crossings of the car showroom accesses have no marked priority.
    • Some of the crossings of the car showroom accesses are blind for emerging motorists because of the showrooms' signs.
    • There are numerous sign legs in the cycleway.
    • The south end terminates in a pinch point corner with a lamp post because enabling fast turns and good lighting for motorists is more important than keeping crash hazards away from the cycleway.

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  • Connect cycleway to Kirby Street

    Created by MJR // 0 threads

    Continuing the Wellesley Road cycleway to the Kirby Street junction would enable cyclists to use the connection from Marshall Yard off Norfolk Street to avoid cycling on the A148 between Norfolk Street and Coburg Street. It would also ease the westbound journey once contraflow cycling is allowed on Norfolk Street.

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  • Access to Central Park from Morston Drift

    Created by MJR // 0 threads

    The access to Central Park (Balls Up Park) is on the north side. The cycleway is on the south side. There is no crossing provided between them, so cyclists either have to bump kerbs if able, or ride on a footway until the next junction. Seems like an easy fix.

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  • Station Road cycle lanes needed

    Martin Lucas-Smith // 0 threads

    Station Road has a bit of cycle lane provision, but it is spotty.

    There should be cycle lanes on both sides of the road, the full length.

    Taxis should have to queue in the station area car park itself, not 250m away on Station Road.

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  • Maid's Causeway / Newmarket Road cycleway

    Martin Lucas-Smith // 0 threads

    Maid's Causeway and the town side of Newmarket Road (until the roundabout) is a mish-mash of a few bits of cycle lane. This is a wide road.

    This should be changed to proper cycle tracks. This can be done without moving pavements.

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  • Dutch-quality cycle tracks for Elizabeth Way bridge

    Martin Lucas-Smith // 0 threads

    Elizabeth Way is wide. Currently cycling is permitted on the pavements.

    This should be changed to have dutch-style cycle tracks, achieved by narrowing the road slightly and narrowing the pavements (which are very wide and not heavily trafficked, so this would not disadvantage pedestrians).

    This would give a safer cycling environment, and improve the pedestrian experience.

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  • Cycleway Shepherd's Bush to Notting Hill

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    Council says:

    Encouraging cycling is one of the Council’s borough transport objectives. We want to make sure cycling is safe, easy, attractive and inclusive for all. We are also concerned about the impacts of poor air quality on our residents, and believe making cycle trips safer is part of the solution to providing alternatives to motor vehicle trips. We hope that new and existing cyclists alike will appreciate being able to use clearly signed routes along quiet side streets.

    We are consulting on a new cycle route - incorporating a section of route we have already consulted on - which serves our communities in Shepherd’s Bush, Holland Park and Notting Hill Gate. The route has been co-designed alongside major resident's associations and local cycling champions.

    The route begins at Holland Park Roundabout, passes through the large paved space between Holland Park Roundabout and Norland Road, then progresses the length of Queensdale Road until it joins a route that we have previously consulted on, and which we will be building in mid-2020.  The new route then picks up again at Clarendon Road, turns into St John’s Gardens and along Lansdowne Crescent before crossing Ladbroke Grove and into Kensington Park Gardens.  Crossing Kensington Park Road, it progresses down Chepstow Villas before meeting a route due for implementation by May 2020.  Please see the cycle route map below for the full alignment.

    In general, the measures that we are proposing are designed to reduce the speed and volume of traffic – where our surveys have suggested these are higher than permitted under TfL’s Cycle Route Quality Criteria – and to reduce the risk of conflict at junctions. The route does not propose fully segregated cycle lanes along the alignment, apart from on the approach to the Kensington Park Road junction. As with all our cycle routes, if implemented, the route will be monitored annually to ensure our proposals have secured the levels of speed and traffic volume appropriate to a cycleway.

    We are asking what you think of our proposals regarding the new cycleway. Please read the following information carefully before filling in the questionnaire no later than 22 March 2020.

    Proposed changes

    At the junction of Queensdale Road/St Ann’s Villas, a new raised table is proposed, aiming to encourage drivers to slow down where cyclists and pedestrians are crossing. 

    On Lansdowne Road, at the junction with St John’s Gardens, we are proposing to permit two-way cycling in this section of one-way road. To facilitate this, we propose to cut back the build out on the western side, providing more carriageway space to allow a short section of cycle lane. This short lane will help warn drivers that the road is two-way for cyclists, and encourage cyclists and vehicles to correctly position themselves at this junction. 

    Where Lansdowne Crescent meets Ladbroke Grove, we are proposing to close Lansdowne Crescent to enable cyclists to safely reach a new proposed parallel crossing facility across the busy Ladbroke Grove. Vehicles will still be able to use St John’s Gardens. To facilitate a new turning circle for vehicles at the proposed ‘cul-de-sac’ end of Lansdowne Crescent, we are proposing removal of three resident parking bays.

    To allow cyclists to cross Ladbroke Grove, we are proposing upgrading the current zebra crossing to a parallel crossing (that can be used by both pedestrians and cyclists) and extensions to the footways on the eastern side to provide small areas of shared-space footway.

    On Kensington Park Gardens, where traffic speeds are on the high side, we are proposing three sinusoidal road humps and an entry treatment at the junction with Ladbroke Grove. Sinusoidal humps are designed so that when driving or cycling over them at lower speeds, they are more comfortable to drive over than traditional humps, but if travelling at an inappropriate speed, they cause a noticeable ‘bump,’ encouraging slower speeds. We know that some people are concerned that road humps contribute to poor air quality, when they lead to drivers braking and accelerating hard. We have designed the proposals in line with government guidance on the correct spacing between the humps to avoid hard braking and acceleration. We have recently introduced sinusoidal humps in St James’s Gardens and we also use them when we resurface roads with traditional humps – for example, Abbotsbury Road already features some sinusoidal humps. 

    We are proposing some restrictions at the junction of Kensington Park Gardens/Kensington Park Road/Chepstow Villas, where traffic flows are high on both Chepstow Villas and Kensington Park Road

    Kensington Park Gardens will be entry only from Kensington Park Road. Traffic will still be able to access and exit Kensington Park Gardens at the western junction with Ladbroke Grove.

    At the junction of Kensington Park Road and Chepstow Villas, traffic exiting Chepstow Villas will have to turn left (south). Traffic would not be able to enter Chepstow Villas from Kensington Park Road, but vehicles will be still be able to access and exit Chepstow Villas at the eastern junction with Portobello Road

    These proposals would reduce rat-running through Chepstow Villas and Kensington Park Gardens and enable the introduction of a short section of segregated bi-directional cycle path and a new parallel ‘tiger’ crossing for pedestrians and cyclists across Kensington Park Road. We are also proposing some changes to the planting in Chepstow Villas, with the addition of new planters and potentially a rain garden. Should the proposals go ahead, we will monitor the effects of any traffic displacement carefully to see if further changes are required on neighbouring roads.

    At the junction of Chepstow Villas/Portobello Road - where we know many of our residents and tourists cross regularly to explore Portobello Road - we are proposing a raised table and footway extensions to encourage slower vehicle speeds where cyclists and pedestrians are crossing the junction. 

    What happens next?

    A full report of the results of the consultation will be presented to the Executive Director for Environment and Communities, who will then make a decision on whether the proposed changes should be implemented. 

    After this consultation, should the initial response be positive, the Council will be carrying out further statutory consultation in order to amend traffic orders to facilitate implementation of the proposals.

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  • Central London Cycle Grid Section 1: Queensbridge Rd b/w Hackney Rd & Whiston Rd

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    From Hackney council:

    Help us improve cycling on Queensbridge Road between Hackney Road and Whiston Road

    We are seeking your views on proposals that will create a protected cycling route along Queensbridge Road to form part of a network of safe cycling routes between the Quietway link at Whiston Road and Quietway 13 at Columbia Road.

    Hackney Council is working in partnership with Tower Hamlets and Transport for London (TfL) to make cycle accessibility improvements on Queensbridge Road from Hackney Road to Dalston Lane as part of the Central London Cycle Grid (CLCG) from Bethnal Green to Dalston Lane. The improvements at Queensbridge Road are being developed in three sections:

    • Section I: Hackney Road – Whiston Road
    • Section II: Whiston Road – Middleton Road
    • Section III: Middleton Road – Dalston Lane

    Hackney, Tower Hamlets, and TfL are committed to making our streets safer for everyone. These changes aim to encourage more walking and cycling, improve air quality and reduce emissions within the local area. Hackney and Tower Hamlets recognise that streets are not just places to park vehicles or drive, but to walk and cycle on too. They are the places where we socialise and live our lives. An aspiration of both boroughs is to reclaim streets from motor traffic and congestion and transform them into attractive and liveable neighbourhoods.

    Queensbridge Road is one such street. Although it is a relatively wide road (about 10.5 metres wide), it was designed for the rapid transit of motorised vehicles and parking. The traffic islands and hatched road markings leave little room for other road users such as pedal cyclists and pedestrians. Between Hackney Road and Whiston Road, 28 collisions were recorded between 2013 and 2017. Sixteen of them involved pedal cyclists.

    The proposed improvements would change the nature of Queensbridge Road to make it a healthier, safer and more pleasant environment for walking and cycling, reflecting the needs of the local area, including its residential estates, Haggerston Park and Haggerston School.

    What are the proposals?

    The following measures are proposed:

    Queensbridge Road raised cycle tracks

    • Installing two metre wide raised cycle tracks between Hackney Road and Whiston Road. These will be next to the existing pavements on both sides of the road. The raised cycle tracks will be separated from motorised traffic by a kerb and from pedestrians by a pedestrian/cycle separator (see example of a separator on page 11 in the FAQs section).
    • Installing a mandatory cycle lane on the carriageway next to the cycle hire scheme at Kent Street.

    Dunloe Street shared zebra crossing

    • Installing a raised table with a parallel pedestrian/cycle crossing (shared zebra crossing for pedestrians and cyclists) at the junction of Dunloe Street and Queensbridge Road. The parallel crossing will allow cyclists and pedestrians to cross Queensbridge Road under the controlled conditions of a zebra crossing. The raised junction table will provide a step-free pedestrian crossing and help with encouraging drivers to keep to the 20mph speed limit.
    • Closing Dunloe Street on both arms with Queensbridge Road to motor traffic to reduce the potential conflict between turning traffic and pedal cyclists and reduce rat running.

    Hackney Road junction improvements

    • Installing a raised entry table at the junction of Hackney Road and Horatio Street to provide pedestrians with step-free crossing facilities.
    • Replacing the existing traffic islands on Hackney Road with wider pedestrian-friendly traffic islands.
    • Refurbishing the road and pavements around the junction.
    • Removing clutter such as redundant guard railings and signs at the junction. Installing double yellow lines between the pedestrian crossings at the junction.
    • Installing low level cycle signals with early release crossing facilities for cyclists at Queensbridge Road and Horatio Street, subject to junction capacity.

    Kent Street raised entry table and zebra crossing

    • Installing a raised entry table at the junction of Kent Street and Queensbridge Road for a step-free pedestrian/cycle crossing at this location.
    • Installing a raised table for the existing zebra crossing at Edith Street to provide controlled step-free crossing facilities for pedestrians when crossing Queensbridge Road. Due to the nature of the road at this location, a parallel pedestrian/ cycle crossing was considered unsuitable.

    Refurbishment of pavements and carriageways

    • The existing pavements adjacent to the raised cycle tracks will be refurbished using standard paving materials. Blended pedestrian crossings will be installed at Kent Street and Dunloe Street side road junctions to highlight the priority of pedestrians over pedal cycles and motorised traffic from the side roads (see example of a blended crossing on page 11 in the FAQs section).

    Whiston Road junction

    • Installing ‘advanced stop lines’ (ASLs) for cyclists at the southern arm of Queensbridge Road connected to the raised cycle track with road markings.
    • Low level cycle signals with early release crossing facilities for cyclists will be considered as part of Section II between Whiston Road and Middleton Road.

    Please download the plans below for more details

    Layout plans from Hackney Road to Whiston Road

    Location plan

    Layout plans from Hackney Road to Whiston Road

    Detail 1: Dunloe Street junction

    Detail 2: Hackney Road junction

    Detail 3: Kent Road junction

    What are the potential impacts of the proposals?

    • If approved, these proposals would provide safe, protected cycling facilities for cyclists between Hackney Road and Whiston Road. Six collisions resulting in slight personal injuries were recorded in 2017 between Hackney Road and Whiston Road, three of which involved pedal cyclists.
    • They would also provide step free crossing facilities for pedestrians at side roads and at controlled pedestrian crossing points.
    • The reduced road width would help reduce the average traffic speeds (outside Haggerston School) to under 20mph.
    • The proposals would help improve accessibility for pedal cyclists and pedestrians at major junctions such as at Hackney Road.
    • Schemes of this nature are expected to contribute to improved air quality as they both regulate private motor vehicle traffic and reduce capacity. The introduction of cycle lanes also increases the distance between polluting vehicles and pedestrians and residents, reducing the effects of pollution.

    Parking

    • The proposals would affect all the parking on Queensbridge Road between Hackney Road and Whiston Road where the existing parking bays will be removed.
    • The existing car club and loading bay at Queensbridge Road will be relocated to Dunloe Street (east). A new electric charging point will also be installed on the same bay.
    • A parking stress survey confirmed that the existing parking bays on the side roads are able to absorb the impact of displaced cars from Queensbridge Road.
    • The existing residents parking bay on Horatio Street would be changed slightly to create space for passing cyclists.
    • The single yellow line between pedestrian crossings at the Hackney Road junction would be converted to double yellow lines.
    • Parking for visitors to the Columbia Road Flower Market would still be available at the ‘pay and display’ parking bays on Yorkton Street, Scawfell Street and Thurtle Road.

    Future schemes

    The rest of the cycle grid to the north of Whiston Road will be consulted on and developed as follows:

    • Section II: Whiston Road to Middleton Road (2020–2021)
    • Section III: Middleton Road to Dalston Lane (2021–2022)

    What happens next?

    Your views will be taken into account as part of the detailed design process. We will publish the consultation responses as well as the decisions made at consultations.hackney.gov.uk  

    To keep up to date with this and other plans, please visit hackney.gov.uk/street-consultations

    Permanent works

    If the scheme goes ahead, following consultation, we expect construction works to start in January 2020.

    Frequently Asked Questions

    Q. What is a raised cycle track? Can pedestrians and motorised traffic use the cycle track?

    A. A raised cycle track is a section of highway where pedal cyclists have right of way. It is vertically separated from motorised traffic by a kerb and from pedestrians by a raised pedestrian/cycle separator.

    Q. What is a parallel pedestrian and cyclist crossing? Who has priority when crossing the road on this type of crossing?

    A. A parallel pedestrian and cyclist crossing works like a zebra crossing that allows cyclists and pedestrians to cross the road, giving priority over motorised traffic. Vehicles should stop at the ‘Give Way’ road markings, as in conventional zebra crossings.

    Q. What are blended pedestrian crossings and will traffic give way to pedestrians at them?

    A. Blended crossings are pedestrian crossing points designed to slow down vehicles when entering or exiting side roads, encouraging vehicles to give way to pedestrians crossing the road.

    Q. What is a parallel pedestrian and cyclist crossing? Who has priority when crossing the road on this type of crossing?

    A. A parallel pedestrian and cyclist crossing works like a zebra crossing that allows cyclists and pedestrians to cross the road, giving priority over motorised traffic. Vehicles should stop at the ‘Give Way’ road markings, as in conventional zebra crossings

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  • Thessaly Road SW8

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    Council says:

    Wandsworth Council would like to hear your views on proposed improvements for pedestrians and cyclists along Thessaly Road, enhancing access and the local environment.

    As motorised vehicle movements are relatively low on Thessaly Road, the proposals aim to provide safer infrastructure for more vulnerable road users.

    The proposed introduction of raised, controlled crossing points would benefit pedestrians, particularly school children visiting local community facilities and St George’s Primary School, whilst also slowing traffic speeds along Thessaly Road.

    Within the scope of the scheme, Thessaly Road would also have new raised ‘Copenhagen style’ junctions with side roads, to create an improved pedestrian and cycle user experience and slow down traffic joining Thessaly Road. ‘Copenhagen style’ junctions allow cyclists and pedestrians to have priority over vehicles exiting the side roads. The scheme will also include installation of new high-quality paving materials and new cycle parking.

    A segregated cycle track would provide a safe route for cyclists between Battersea Park Road at the north end (which is the subject of proposed improvements being developed in partnership with Transport for London) and Wandsworth Road and Lambeth to the south. It would also provide a safe route to the two new Northern Line Extension stations opening in 2021.

    The proposals include improvements to the public realm at the junction of Condell Road, Deeley Road and Battersea Park Road, featuring new seating areas and new planting.

    The scheme is part of a package of infrastructure improvements in the area which include proposals for a Controlled Parking Zone and a colourful ‘Happy Street’ redesign for the Thessaly Road rail bridge, all funded by contributions from developers in the area.

    In line with strategic masterplans for the Vauxhall Nine Elms Battersea Opportunity Area, Thessaly Road has been identified as a key strategic link for cycle and pedestrian movements from north to south through the opportunity area, and so the proposed improvements reflect the need to meet changing demands of this growing central London area.

    It is important for the Council to know the views of local residents and businesses before progressing with any improvements.

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  • Ilford - Barking Riverside Cycleway

    Created by Simon Munk // 6 threads

    This 7km route will link Ilford to Barking Riverside via Barking town centre using mostly quieter back streets. It would include key connections to the cycle route between Barking and Tower Gateway, Ilford Elizabeth line station and Barking Riverside Development - this includes more than 10,000 new homes and a new London Overground station.

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  • Barnet Cycleway between Hornsey and North Finchley

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    Barnet council says...

    Overview

    You and others in your area have a unique opportunity to benefit from Transport for London (TfL) funding to improve walking and cycling routes between Hornsey and North Finchley.

    We want to hear your views on our proposals that will transform streets in the borough. The improvements will help provide a future Cycleway between Alexandra Park in The London Borough of Haringey, through quiet streets and over the North Circular into The London Borough of Barnet; ending at North Finchley High Road A1000 amongst a busy parade of shops and cafes.

    Background

    The proposals are an important part of the Mayor of London Transport Strategy and Barnet’s ambition to get more people to walk and cycle. The proposals are guided by the Healthy Streets Approach(External link) which aims to encourage walking, cycling and public transport and make London greener, healthier and more pleasant.

    We have commissioned Sustrans Ltd(External link) as project coordinator and delivery partner for the Barnet section of the Cycleway route from Hornsey to North Finchley.

    Over the last two years Sustrans, in partnership with the council, engaged with residents in specific areas along the route to better understand local travel choices and concerns, road traffic and the quality of local streets.

    The proposals we are consulting on aim to address these issues, ensuring that improvements help to create an environment in which traffic is both reduced and slowed, and in which air quality is improved.

    What are we seeking your views on?

    This consultation is asking for your views on the draft concept designs for the route.

    Specifically, we are seeking your views on:

    • the layout of proposed street alterations within the draft concept designs
    • any comments you may have on the overall draft route.

    For more information on our proposals please read our FAQ document.

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  • Kensington High Street to Notting Hill Gate

    Created by Simon Still // 1 thread

    Cycleway: Kensington High Street to Notting HillPublic consultation

    Encouraging cycling is one of the Council’s borough transport objectives. We want to make sure cycling is safe, easy, attractive and inclusive for all. We are also concerned about the impacts of poor air quality on our residents, and believe making cycle trips safer is part of the solution to providing alternatives to motor vehicle trips. We hope that new and existing cyclists alike will appreciate being able to use clear, direct routes along quiet side streets.

    We are consulting on a new cycle route, linking Kensington High Street to the cycle route known as Quietway 2 in Notting Hill. It begins at Melbury Road, passes along Abbotsbury Road and Holland Park, crosses Holland Park Avenue into Norland Square, then travels along Queensdale Road, Princedale Road, Walmer Road/Portland Road, Clarendon Road and Blenheim Crescent where the route joins Quietway 2. In general, the measures that we are proposing are designed to reduce the speed and volume of traffic, reduce the risk of conflict at junctions and where cycle facilities already exist, upgrade them.

    We are asking what you think of our proposals regarding the new Cycleway. Please read the following information carefully before filling in the below questionnaire no later than 12 June 2019. For further information, please email us at: cycling@rbkc.gov.uk or call: 020 7361 3766.

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  • Proposed improvements between Wood Lane and Notting Hill Gate

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    TfL says:

    We want your views on our proposals to transform roads in west London through four connected neighbourhood improvement schemes between Wood Lane and Notting Hill Gate.

    The proposals are an important part of the Mayor's Transport Strategy. The proposals are guided by the Mayor's Healthy Streets Approach, which aims to encourage walking, cycling and public transport and make London greener, healthier and more pleasant. The proposals are also an important part of the Mayor's Walking and Cycling Action Plans. These complementary plans set out how we and London boroughs will work to increase the number of people walking and cycling, helping to address poor air quality and congestion, while improving infrastructure to make walking and cycling even easier, safer and more accessible for everyone.

    These proposals would provide benefits for road users and communities in these areas, making it easier to cross busy roads, removing through traffic on some residential roads and offering a segregated space for people to cycle in west London. They would form part of London’s emerging cycling network and create a more appealing street environment for everyone to enjoy.

    The proposals include:

    • New and upgraded pedestrian crossings
    • Public space improvements along the route to create more welcoming streets for people and communities to enjoy
    • Two-way segregated cycle track throughout
    • Changes to bus stop locations, with removal of some, and layout changes throughout, including new bus stop bypasses for cyclists
    • Making some side roads entry or exit only to help the safe and timely movement of traffic
    • Removal of some trees in Notting Hill Gate and Holland Park Avenue to accommodate the facilities with appropriate new trees planted nearby
    • Changes to parking and loading bays and hours of operation  

    The proposed changes presented in this consultation are not final. We welcome your views on our proposals and your feedback will inform how we progress the schemes.

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  • Hills Road cycleway extension to Addenbrooke's - City Deal scheme

    Martin Lucas-Smith // 1 thread

    Hills Road and Addenbrooke's Route is one of the five City Deal 'cross-city improvements' schemes.

    "This is a key route for people accessing local schools and sixth form colleges as well as the Biomedical Campus. The cycle facilities at the junction of Hills Road/Long Road/Queen Edith's Way are limited. The two proposed options aim to provide safer crossing for pedestrians and cyclists accessing the Biomedical Campus and local area."

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  • Facilities on Groathill Avenue to improve QuietRoute 20

    Created by Chris Paton // 0 threads

    What?
    Consider facilities on Groathill Avenue to improve connectivity between Craigleith Hill Avenue (quiet road part of QR20) and the junction with NCN1 / North Edinburgh Path Network and the Craigleith Retail Park.

    Why?
    Groathill Avenue has no cycling facilities on it whatsoever, even though it is a link the council's QuietRoutes network. It is an important link in QR20 that connects Craigleith, Inverleith, and Stockbridge with the main offroad cycle network and additionally a busy retail park. Groathill Avenue is certainly not quiet, especially at the weekend when retail park traffic combined with parked cars makes it really hazardous and not at all cycle or pedestrian friendly. Improving this would encourage cyclists and help reduce traffic pressures in the long term.

    How?
    Groathill Avenue has reasonable width and so there does seem to be space for either a shared use footpath or a dedicated cycleway, particularly if parking restrictions are implemented to allow free movement of traffic along the remaining carrigageway. Given that the street has houses on it I believe a dedicated cycleway is best to avoid conflict between cyclists and homeowners. In either case, the east side of the street makes most sense as this means that cyclists can use the existing toucan crossing at the offroad path access and continue north to Craigleith Hill Avenue. As part of this it would make sense to improve the connection at Craigleith Avenue with better signage/markings and dropped kerbs to access the new path.

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  • Advanced stop lines/Cycle giveway on side roads off of Avenue

    Created by pmwebb // 0 threads

    The side roads that access the avenue are a danger to the users of the shared path. This is especially prevalent on the northbound side in the mornings. Cars seem to have two modes:
    1) stationary avenue traffic - approach at speed and hit the anchors in time not to hit the queue
    2) no queue on avenue - approach at speed hoping not to have to stop. Then go for it or again hit the anchors.

    In both stopping cases this blocks the crossing for the cycle/pedestrian

    Ideally there would be an advance giveaway line/colored tarmac to identify the possibility of crossing bikes/pedestrians

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