Things tagged 'greenwich'

8 issues found for 'greenwich':

  • The Royal Parks' draft Movement Strategy

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    The Royal Park says:
    "The Royal Parks is embarking on an exciting and ambitious journey to develop a Movement Strategy that will influence movement and transportation throughout our parks and London.

    What is the Movement Strategy?

    The Movement Strategy will set a long-term vision for how park visitors will move within, access and subsequently experience the parks.

    The strategy will include a comprehensive exploration of all movement and access related issues and opportunities that are relevant to the parks both now and into the foreseeable future.

    This will include (but is not limited to) increasing safety for all park users, reducing the impact of vehicle-based traffic and reducing conflict between different modes.

    How will it be developed?

    To develop the strategy, we will utilise an evidence-based approach to explore all current and future movement opportunities. Input from key stakeholders, including the general public, will be a critical component in exploring possibilities, conflicts and issues that will inform the creation of the strategy.

    Engagement Phase One – Now Open.

    We are seeking input from key partners including the general public, Transport for London, neighbouring boroughs and all interested parties. This input is a critical component in exploring possibilities, conflicts and issues that will inform the creation of the strategy.This discussion paper sets out the draft aim and principles for our Movement Strategy. These summarise our aspirations and provide the basis for developing a series of bold projects and proposals across all eight parks."

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  • Quietway 1 extension - Blackheath Common - Lewisham Consultation

    Created by Lewisham Cyclists // 1 thread

    Overview

    The Mayor of London’s aim for 2041 is for 80% of all trips in London to be made on foot, by cycle or using public transport.

    LB Lewisham is working on initiatives to help reach this target by gearing towards a “Healthy Streets” approach as set out in the Mayor’s Transport Strategy (2017) which encourage people to use their car less. This will help reduce the amount of dirty air in London, encourage active travel and tackle congestion on our already clogged up roads.

    (for more information on the Mayor’s Transport Strategy and the Healthy streets approach follow the link below)

    Mayor of London's Transport Strategy

    As part of the Healthy Streets approach the borough is working on building a comprehensive “Quietway Network” so residents can choose cycling  and walking as a convenient transport choice.

    This consultation is seeking comment on proposals to upgrade the existing cycle route that runs through Blackheath Common as part of the TfL funded Quietway programme to encourage more people to walk and cycle. The proposals include three new crossings over:

    • Prince Charles Road
    • Prince of Wales Road
    • South Row

    All feedback from the consultation will be used to inform the final proposals ahead of construction works in Spring 2019. These improvements will form part of an extension of Quietway Route 1 which currently connects Waterloo and Greenwich

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  • Quietway Consultation in Bromley No2

    Created by John H Wood // 1 thread

    The London Borough of Bromley, working with Transport for London, is proposing to
    make a number of improvements between Lower Sydenham and Kent House to
    contribute to the development of a Quietway cycle route between Greenwich and
    Kent House.

    Quietways
    Quietways are walking and cycling routes primarily on lightly trafficked back streets,
    through parks and alongside waterways providing quieter routes away from main
    roads designed to appeal, particularly, to new and inexperienced cyclists. They will
    provide safe and attractive links to shops, stations, schools, workplaces and
    destinations throughout London.

    This particular route is from Greenwich to Kent House station and is an upgrade of
    the existing National Cycle Network Route 21. The route will form part of the London
    wide network of Quietways and Superhighways being developed jointly by London
    Boroughs and Transport for London
    .
    Bridge Road
    At present The National Cycle Network Route 21 runs along Kangley Bridge Road,
    however, due to the number of HGVs this can be an intimidating road for cyclists so
    whilst already popular is likely to discourage significant increases in cycling. This
    new route will upgrade the existing facilities for walking and cycling by providing a
    shared path along the eastern side of the road achieved by widening the footway to
    approximately 3.5m. Removing cyclists from the road will reduce the chance of
    conflict between vehicles and cyclists.

    The project will also seek to make Kangley Bridge Road a more attractive place to
    use and work in as a result of new tree planting and formalised parking, the details of
    which we are keen to establish in dialogue with stakeholders.

    River Pool Path
    It is proposed to widen River Pool Path between Lennard Road and the sharp 90
    degree bend along the path, to make a better quality shared route for pedestrians
    and cyclists. The wider path will enable the marking that currently segregates
    pedestrians and cyclists to be removed as research shows fully shared paths to be
    safer than segregated facilities for both pedestrians and cyclists. These
    improvements will be accompanied by clear new signage denoting the shared
    designation of the path.

    Lennard Road
    It is proposed to replace the existing informal pedestrian crossing between River
    Pool Path and Cator Park across Lennard Road with a new parallel zebra crossing.
    This will enable pedestrians and cyclists to safely cross Lennard Road, improve the
    link between River Pool Path and Cator Park and, thereby, improve the continuity of
    the Quietway route by reducing the severance caused by the road.

    Cator Park
    The route uses the existing cycle path through Cator Park to provide cyclists with a
    safe off-road route that will be more attractive than cycling on the road. To ensure
    the route is safe and secure for use in the evenings, especially during the winter
    months it is proposed to introduce solar powered wayfinding lighting along the
    section of path. The lighting will be unobtrusive and have a minimal environmental
    impact.

    Aldersmead Road
    At the junction of Ringwold Close with Aldersmead Road, it is proposed to introduce
    an informal pedestrian crossing to improve access to Cator Park including improving
    visibility for those exiting Cator Park on foot or by bicycle

    Kings Hall Road
    At the junction of Kings Hall Road with Aldersmead Road it is proposed to replace
    the existing refuge islands with new ones positioned in slightly revised locations to
    make it easier for pedestrians to cross Kings Hall Road. The road markings will also
    be revised to enable cyclists to safely turn from Aldersmead Road to Kings Hall
    Road.

    Kent House Station
    It is proposed to widen a small section of the footway outside the station entrance, in
    order to provide safe and convenient access to the station for cyclists using this
    route and will provide an easy connection to the existing London Cycle Network
    route which continues to Croydon from Kent House Station. It is also proposed to
    improve the public realm at the station entrance with the introduction of trees and
    planters

    Funding is also being sought to improve the quality and quantity of the cycle parking
    provision at the station. This is currently very well utilised and demand for it is
    expected to increase once the Quietway cycle route to the station has been
    delivered.

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  • Quietway Consultation in Bromley

    Created by John H Wood // 1 thread

    Please forgive me if I've mucked this up, I am not very experienced at this.

    The London Borough of Bromley, working with Transport for London (TfL) is proposing to make a number of improvements to streets between Lower Sydenham and Bromley town centre to contribute to the development of a Quietway cycle route between Lower Sydenham and Bromley.

    Quietways
    Quietways are walking and cycling routes primarily on lightly trafficked back streets, through parks and alongside waterways providing quieter routes away from main roads designed to appeal, particularly, to new and inexperienced cyclists. They will provide safe and attractive links to shops, stations, schools, workplaces and destinations throughout London.
    This proposed route is from River Walk in the London Borough of Lewisham to Bromley town centre and will upgrade the section of the existing London Cycle Network route 27 between New Beckenham and Bromley town centre. The route will form part of a London wide network of Quietways and Superhighways being developed jointly by London Boroughs and TfL.

    Worsley Bridge Road
    The Quietway runs along Worsley Bridge Road which, due to the speed and volume of traffic, makes it an unattractive road to cycle on. We are therefore proposing to widen and convert the footway on the southern side of Worsley Bridge Road from the Junction of Copers Cope Road to the junction of South End Lane in Lewisham to a shared footway/cycleway.
    This will provide a high quality facility for cyclists and pedestrians, providing access to Lower Sydenham Station. By providing a shared path cyclists do not need to mix with general traffic thereby improving safety for all road users. The scheme will also introduce a zebra crossing between Meadowview Road and Montana Gardens as well as upgrading the existing refuge at the junction with Copers Cope Road.

    Southend Road
    As the Quietway is required to cross Southend Road, we are proposing to install a Parallel Zebra Crossing for pedestrians and cyclists crossing between Park Road and Foxgrove Road. This crossing will also be of benefit to existing pedestrians, especially for children crossing the road on their way to school.

    Ridley Road to Ravensbourne Road footpath
    In order to provide a safe continuous cycle route it is proposed to allow cycling along the short section of footpath between Ridley Road and Ravensbourne Road, which will be permitted via a Cycle Track Order. Access to the path will be provided via a new dropped kerb at the end of Ridley Road with a new tree or planter installed leading to the path. Vegetation will be cut back to provide additional width for both pedestrians and cyclists and special sinusoidal speed humps for cyclists will be installed at the Ravensbourne Road end of the path to reduce the potential for cyclists to speed entering the shared area.

    Ravensbourne Road
    In order to allow cyclists to access Bromley South Station using the Quietway, it is proposed to allow contra-flow cycling on Ravensbourne Road, which would be achieved by exempting cyclists from the one-way restriction on the street through a combination of signs and markings. Cycle contra-flows provide more direct routes for cyclists and can allow them to avoid travelling on busy roads and are quite common across the UK with several already in place across the Borough.

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  • Cycle Superhighway Route 4 from Tower Bridge to Greenwich

    Created by Fran Graham // 3 threads

    TfL say:

    We want your views on proposals to transform roads in Bermondsey, Rotherhithe, Deptford and Greenwich to make cycling and walking easier, safer and more appealing.

    Cycle Superhighway 4 (CS4) would provide a continuous segregated cycle route between Tower Bridge and Greenwich, along with new pedestrian crossings, improved public spaces and a host of other improvements aimed at creating a more attractive environment for all users and accommodating the area’s future growth. This consultation does not include proposals for Lower Road, which will be consulted on at a later date (find out more).

    CS4 would form part of London’s expanding network of Cycle Superhighways, an important part of the Mayor’s draft Transport Strategy and Healthy Streets Approach, which aim to encourage walking, cycling and public transport, making London greener, healthier and more pleasant.

    Summary of proposed changes

    Our proposals for CS4 include:

    Two-way segregated cycle track on Tooley Street, Jamaica Road, Evelyn Street and Creek Road, providing a dedicated space for people who want to cycle
    Five new signal-controlled pedestrian crossings and upgrades to over 20 existing pedestrian crossings, making it easier and safer to cross the road
    Building on the recent short-term improvements at Rotherhithe Roundabout by redesigning the roundabout to improve safety as part of our Safer Junctions programme.
    Installing a new eastbound bus gate on the Jamaica Road approach to Rotherhithe Roundabout, giving buses priority at the roundabout and improving bus access to Lower Road
    New and improved public spaces at Deptford High Street and Rotherhithe Roundabout, including new paving and trees
    New traffic restrictions, including banned turns on some side roads along Jamaica Road and at Deptford High Street
    Changes to some bus stop layouts and locations, including new bus stop bypasses for cyclists (find out more about bus stop bypasses)

    Why are we proposing CS4?

    Around 3,500 trips are already being made daily by people cycling along the A200. In addition, this route has some of the highest numbers of pedestrian numbers in London. CS4 is designed to help us meet the target set out in the Mayor’s draft Transport Strategy of changing the way people choose to travel so that, by 2041, 80 per cent of all trips in London are made by walking, cycling or public transport, up from 64 per cent today.

    Improving safety

    Safety is one of the main barriers to cycling in London. Between September 2013 and August 2016, there were 93 recorded collisions involving cyclists and 49 recorded collisions involving pedestrians along this section of the A200. Our research shows that, were the route safer, more journeys could be made on foot or by cycle.

    CS4 would separate cyclists from motor traffic by providing kerbed cycle tracks along its length. At major junctions, cycles would be separated from motor traffic using cycling-specific traffic light phases to reduce the risk of collisions. Our proposals also include major safety improvements at Rotherhithe Roundabout, which was identified as a priority for changes as part of our Safer Junctions programme.

    Encouraging active travel in south-east London

    Cycling is now a major mode of transport in London. There are more than 670,000 cycle trips a day in the capital, an increase of over 130 per cent since 2000. The introduction of the East-West and North-South Cycle Superhighways has seen a significant increase in cycling as a mode of transport along those routes.

    An emerging network of Cycle Superhighways exists in north, south and east London, but none yet in south-east London. Our proposals would bring a high-quality cycle facility to south-east London, encouraging more people to start cycling. Our analysis shows that sections of Tooley Street and Jamaica Road are among the top one per cent of areas for cycle demand in London, while the entire CS4 route is in the top five per cent.

    Improving facilities for cycling and walking along the proposed CS4 route would not only benefit those who currently walk and cycle, but could also have a positive effect on public health by increasing the levels of physical activity in the area. Our research shows that sections of the proposed route are in the top one per cent of London’s road network for its potential to switch from vehicles to cycling as a means of transport. The majority of the route is in the top five per cent. There is also great potential to encourage people to switch from making short vehicle trips to walking.

    These proposals form part of the Mayor of London’s plan for Healthy Streets. This is a long-term vision to encourage more Londoners to walk and cycle by making London’s streets healthier, safer and more welcoming. Currently, only 34% of Londoners take 20 minutes of physical activity on any given day. The new cycle facilities and pedestrian improvements are designed to help encourage more people to use active and sustainable modes of transport.

    Improving places

    Our proposals would help connect Bermondsey, Rotherhithe, Deptford and Greenwich, linking important amenities and facilities, making them more pleasant places to live, work, shop and spend time. We would install new seating areas and cycle parking to provide space for people to rest and spend time in these town centres, along with other improvements such as new plants and trees. Our proposals aim to create more welcoming and inclusive streets for individuals and communities to enjoy.

    Joined-up improvements to accommodate growth

    London is growing and changing, with the city's population forecast to rise from 9 million people today to 10.5 million in 2041. We must find new ways to plan London's growth, including proposals like CS4 to encourage healthy and sustainable transport. CS4 is part of a package of planned and proposed improvements aimed at helping this part of south-east London accommodate expected growth, including the regeneration of Canada Water, recent improvements made to ease congestion at Rotherhithe Roundabout, and the proposed Rotherhithe to Canary Wharf river crossing.

    Where would CS4 go?

    The proposed route would run along Tooley Street, Jamaica Road, Evelyn Street and Creek Road, linking Bermondsey, Rotherhithe, Deptford and Greenwich.

    Lower Road

    This consultation does not include proposals for Lower Road, which will be consulted on at a later date. Lower Road is adjacent to Canada Water, an area that will see major regeneration and development in the next few years. To understand how these developments and future transport schemes would affect the existing road network, we have jointly commissioned a Strategic Transport Study with the London Borough of Southwark. When completed, this study will inform the design for Lower Road, ensuring that it meets the future needs of the community.

    What is proposed for CS4?

    Improvements for cycling

    New two-way segregated cycle track on the north side of Tooley Street, Jamaica Road, Evelyn Street and Creek Road replaces some bus and general traffic lanes
    Cycle track switches to the south side at the junction with Southwark Park Road to bypass Rotherhithe Roundabout
    Proposals for the Lower Road section to be consulted on at a later date
    Cyclists bypass traffic light controlled junctions at Abbey Street and Deptford Church Street
    Cyclists are separately controlled by signals at all other junctions
    Connection to proposed cycling Quietway 14 at Tanner Street (find out more about Tanner Street)
    Road design and layout

    Some general traffic lane replaced by new two-way segregated cycle track Redesigned and improved geometry of Rotherhithe Roundabout to encourage better lane discipline and assist all through movements
    Left turn lane on Jamaica Road extended to reduce queueing time for buses and local traffic trying to access Brunel Road
    Removal of some central reservation on Jamaica Road to accommodate new cycling facilities
    Mini-roundabout replaces signalised junction at Oxestalls Road
    Removal of centre line markings on some sections of Evelyn Street to improve road safety
    Making Shad Thames one-way northbound to improve the performance of the junction and reduce pedestrian wait times
    Banning the left turn from Jamaica Road into Bevington Street to provide a continuous eastbound bus lane and improve bus journeys
    Making Cathy Street one-way northbound to remove through-traffic from residential roads, while allowing a new right turn into Cathay Street from Jamaica Road to improve local access
    Making Marigold Street exit-only on to Jamaica Road to improve safety for all road users
    Banning the right turn into Evelyn Street from Watergate Street and Deptford High Street, and banning the right turn into Deptford High Street from Evelyn Street
    Change to buses

    Some bus lane replaced by new two-way segregated cycle track on Jamaica Road, Evelyn Street and Creek Road
    New eastbound bus gate on the Jamaica Road approach to Rotherhithe Roundabout to prioritise bus access to Lower Road
    Changes to bus stop locations along Evelyn Street
    Changes to some bus stop layouts, including new bus stop bypasses for cyclists (find out more about bus stop bypasses)
    Improvements for walking

    Five new signal-controlled pedestrian crossings, including three along Jamaica Road
    Upgrades to existing pedestrian crossings including simpler 8-metre wide crossing outside Bermondsey Station
    6-metre wide toucan crossing (for pedestrians and cyclists) outside Deptford Park Primary school
    6-metre wide pedestrian crossing on desire line opposite Deptford High Street
    Pedestrian crossing on the eastern arm of the Norway Street / Creek Road junction moved to the western arm and widened to 6 metres.
    Pedestrian crossing time saving of over 1 minute expected outside Bermondsey Station and at the Jamaica Road junction with Tanner Street

    Predicted impacts of our proposals

    We are proposing major changes to the road layout to make cycling and walking easier, safer and more appealing. We have considered all road users throughout the design process so as not to have a disproportionate impact on any one group. This section summarises the impacts we predict our proposals to have on different road users.

    General traffic and bus journey times
    The reallocation of road space is expected to change some journey times and traffic movements. We have carried out traffic modelling to predict how the proposals might affect journey times and traffic movement through the area affected by the scheme. A summary of this analysis is available below:

    We would actively monitor and manage traffic conditions following delivery of the scheme. We are investing in advanced traffic signal technology to allow us to better manage traffic depending on differing conditions at any given time, and we are working to improve road user information so people can make informed journey choices before they travel.

    Parking and loading
    Our proposals for CS4 include changes to the layouts of some of the parking and loading bays along the route. Double yellow lines (no parking at any time) would also replace single yellow lines along some sections of Evelyn Street and Creek Road.

    During the consultation period, we will contact premises we think could be affected by these changes. If you think the proposals could affect you or your business, please contact us to let us know (contact details are at the bottom of this page). We encourage you to discuss these proposals with your suppliers.

    Environment
    Our proposals aim to improve the quality of life in the area by:

    Reducing the dominance of motor traffic, allowing people to better enjoy the area
    Improving pedestrian crossings and cycle facilities, to encourage more people to walk and cycle through the area
    Protecting bus journey times to safeguard public transport as a mode of choice
    Although not a traffic-generating scheme, our proposals would change how traffic moves around the area, which may result in some associated and localised changes in air quality and noise levels. Environmental surveys and modelling would take place as part of our ongoing evaluation of these proposals.

    Air pollution is one of the most significant challenges facing London, affecting the health of all Londoners. As part of the plans for new measures to tackle London’s current poor air quality, we are consulting on proposals to bring forward the introduction of the London Ultra Low Emission Zone (ULEZ).

    A number of other schemes to improve London’s air quality are planned, including taking steps to reduce air pollution from our bus fleet, reducing emissions from taxis and private hire vehicles, setting up five Low Emission Neighbourhoods, and expanding the electric vehicle charging network and making it simpler to use.

    We are investing to make London’s streets healthy, safe and attractive places to walk and cycle. Enabling more journeys to be made on foot or by bike can help reduce private vehicle use and associated emissions. Read more about how we are creating Healthy Streets

    Equalities

    How we fulfil our obligations under the Equality Act 2010
    We are subject to the general public sector equality duty set out in Section 149 of the Equality Act 2010, which requires us to have due regard to the need to eliminate discrimination, advance equality of opportunity and foster good relations by reference to people with protected characteristics. The protected characteristics are: age, disability, gender reassignment, marriage and civil partnership, pregnancy and maternity, race, religion or belief, sex and sexual orientation. As part of our decision-making process on the proposals for Cycle Superhighways, we have had due regard to any impacts on those with protected characteristics and the need to ensure that their interests are taken into account.

    In considering the design of our streets, we closely consider the needs of all users throughout the design process. On significant infrastructure projects, such as Cycle Superhighways, we:

    Complete Equality Impact Assessments (EQIAs) at the outset of the project, to review potential impacts on equality target groups, including disabled people
    Carry out public consultations, including targeted engagement with specific users such as (among many others): Royal National Institute of Blind People, Guide Dogs, Age UK, Transport for All, and National Autistic Society
    Ensure we comply with established guidance – such as the Design Manual for Roads and Bridges – which includes detailed requirements for disabled people
    The EQIA completed for CS4 shows positive impacts for black and ethnic minority groups, females, disabled cyclists, and cyclists under 25 and over 65 years of age. Positive impacts have also been identified for disabled pedestrians, as the scheme involves a number of improvements to pedestrian facilities, including wider footways and new and improved crossings. Some negative impacts have been identified where footways are cut back or shared-use footway is introduced. However, the minimum 2-metre standard for footway widths has been maintained to allow two wheelchair users to pass safely. Kerb-protected cycle facilities, which lead to positive impacts for people with protected characteristics when they are cycling, work most effectively when they feature bus stop bypasses. Bus stop bypasses and their impacts are described below.

    Bus stop bypasses
    At bus stop bypasses, the cycle track continues behind the bus stop at carriageway level, providing continuous segregation from motor traffic for people cycling. Bus passengers access a waiting area by crossing the cycle track using a raised, marked crossing point. The waiting area would be at least 2.5 metres wide. Pedestrians would cross the cycle track at raised, marked crossing points to continue their journey.

    Our research has found that bus stop bypasses are safe for all road users, including bus passengers. Routing cycle traffic away from the road is an effective way to create safe, attractive cycling facilities along bus routes. The risk of conflict between cycles and pedestrians has been found to be very low, while providing a dedicated crossing point for bus passengers and design features that encourage slower cycling help to make the bus stop area more comfortable for everyone to use.

    Bus stop bypasses are used across Europe and there are a number of examples in operation or planned across the UK, including in Brighton, Cambridge and Manchester, as well as in London. We introduced some bus stop bypasses on the Cycle Superhighway 2 (CS2) extension between Bow and Stratford in Autumn 2013 and across other Cycle Superhighways in 2015-16.

    We are continuing to engage with accessibility and cycling groups and carry out additional research into the type and layout of pedestrian crossings at bus stop bypasses. We have a dedicated working group overseeing on-street trialling of the use of zebra crossings over cycle tracks at bus stop bypasses. This group includes representatives from Transport for All, the Royal National Institute of Blind People, Guide Dogs, Age UK London, London TravelWatch, Cycling Embassy of Great Britain, Living Streets, the London Cycling Campaign and Cycling UK. We will incorporate findings of these further investigations, including the outcomes of discussions about the trial with the working group, into final proposals for CS4.

    Find out more about bus stop bypasses

    Tactile paving
    We would use tactile paving on all crossings and traffic islands throughout CS4. Along the route, tactile paving would be designed according to Department for Transport guidance. Local standards would apply in the London Borough of Lewisham and the Royal Borough of Greenwich.

    Accessibility for cyclists with disabilities
    CS4 would be suitable for use by disabled cyclists using adapted cycles, such as hand cycles and tricycles. The designs adhere to the principles for inclusive cycling set out in our London Cycling Design Standards. Cycle tracks on CS4 would be as wide as possible and a smooth riding surface would be provided, with the entire cycle route to be resurfaced.

    Next steps

    We will analyse and consider all of the responses received to the consultation, and expect to publish our response early in 2018.

    For the Lower Road section, we have jointly commissioned a Strategic Transport Study with the London Borough of Southwark to understand how developments and future transport schemes would affect the existing road network. When completed, this study will inform the design for Lower Road, ensuring that it meets the future needs of the community. Consultation on proposals for Lower Road will take place at a later date

    Subject to the outcome of consultation and agreeing proposals with partner boroughs, we would aim to commence construction on CS4 in late 2018. We would plan construction carefully to minimise disruption to those who live, work and travel through the areas.

    As part of this planning, we would coordinate closely with other construction works in the area, and consider alternative ways of working including advance works, weekends and evenings. We would also carry out an extensive communications and engagement campaign to ensure residents, businesses and others travelling through the works areas have the information they need to plan ahead and adapt their travel arrangements where necessary, reducing any impact on their journeys during the construction period.

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  • Charlton Riverside Formal Consultation

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    Greenwich Council says:
    We want to know your initial views on the draft master plan for Charlton Riverside. Please read the public consultation document and associated documents attached to this listing.
    Description:
    The Council is preparing a new planning policy document. This document will support the existing Core Strategy policies and provide additional detail on the future of Charlton Riverside.
    Royal Greenwich is committed to the regeneration of Charlton Riverside and the creation of a new, sustainable neighbourhood providing both jobs and homes in a balanced way.

    This materplan includes Woolwich Road and a potential parallel new road.

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  • Thames Path Quietway - Pensinsula Ward Proposals

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    Royal Borough of Greenwich are working with its partners Transport for London (TfL) and Sustrans to develop proposals for new ‘Quietway’ routes, to enhance facilities for people cycling or walking, whilst minimising impacts on other road users. This set of schemes would implement improvements along the cross-Peninsula section of the ‘Thames Path Quietway’ in Peninsula Ward. Further proposals for sections of this route in other Wards will be brought forward for consultation in due course.

    What is being proposed?
    For this set of proposals, we are consulting on the following schemes in the Peninsula ward:
    (a) Old Woolwich Road, junction with Lassell Street (scheme ref: QTP3b)
    A more people-friendly junction has been designed to benefit pedestrians and cyclists. This includes kerb build-outs to tighten the junction, particularly on the north side of Old
    Woolwich Road at its junction with Lassell Street, to improve the crossing point for
    pedestrians and slow vehicle speeds. One car parking space will be lost as a result.
    (b) Gibson Street, junction with Banning Street (scheme ref: QTP3c)
    New kerb build-outs are proposed at the junction of Gibson Street with Banning Street,
    which will move the ‘give way’ markings forward and so improve sight lines for cyclists
    turning right out of Gibson Street. In addition a ‘cycle hangar’ secure cycle parking facility is proposed for the wide footway space on the south-western side of this junction (corner of Enderby Street and Banning Street). No car parking spaces will be lost as a result of the proposals.
    (c) Southern Park (adjacent to Ecology Park; scheme ref: QTP8)
    An existing, well-lit, hard standing path borders the southern and eastern perimeter of the Southern Park (adjacent to the Ecology Park), linking West Parkside with the riverside path at Greenwich Yacht Club. No changes are proposed to this path itself; however it is proposed to clearly sign this section only as ‘shared use’ for cyclists and pedestrians. At the existing Toucan crossing at the junction with West Parkside/ Southern Way, extra space will be created by removal of a small section of wooden fencing, and relocation of a small tree.
    (d) Riverside, junction with Lombard Wall (scheme ref: QTP9a)
    Priority will be given to the Thames Path route, providing extra safety and security for
    pedestrians and cyclists. A raised table at the junction of Lombard Wall as it meets Riverside will slow any vehicular traffic. The western side footway will be improved for pedestrians. No car parking spaces will be lost from the proposals.
    (e) Riverside, junction with Anchor and Hope Lane (scheme ref: QTP9b)
    Priority will be given to the Thames Path route, providing extra safety and security for
    pedestrians and cyclists. The cycleway will be realigned to better connect with Riverside,
    and the junction will be resurfaced in green to provide increased awareness of cyclists. No car parking spaces will be lost from the proposals.

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