Bromley Cyclists

Bromley Cyclists are the London Cycling Campaign branch for the London Borough of Bromley.

  • Bromley Local Implementation Plan 3

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    Bromley says:

    The Local Implementation Plan (LIP) is a statutory document, required by the Greater London Authority Act 1999, which sets out how we intend to implement the Mayor's Transport Strategy (MTS) within the borough.
    Each borough has to produce a Local Implementation Plan which must be approved by the Mayor.
    We are consulting on our third Local Implementation Plan for Transport (LIP3). This sets out the borough's approach to transport, including our ambition to improve road safety and reduce road danger, and investment priorities for both the next three years as well as in the longer term to 2041 at a more strategic level.
    Bromley's LIP3 sets out how the council will deliver and work with partners such as rail operators to deliver an efficient and high quality transport network that safely supports borough residents, visitors to the borough for work and leisure and the borough's economy.
    Bromley's population is expected to increase, with the level of population growth presenting challenges for the borough's transport networks. If this growth in demand for travel were to be accompanied by an equal growth in car use, congestion would get worse, with slower journeys for residents and businesses and a probable deterioration in air quality. To accommodate the projected increase in demand for travel, we need to make the most efficient use of the capacity we have on our transport networks. Given this, the LIP3 outlines the borough's priorities, which include improving road safety by reducing collisions and casualties on the roads, making it easier to walk and choose to cycle, reducing congestion and working with partner organisations to deliver new public transport connectivity such as between the borough's main centres and for example Canary Wharf.

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  • southwark draft movement plan

    Created by SallyEva // 1 thread

    We are developing a Movement Plan that will set the direction for transport planning in Southwark over the next 20 years – this work will influence the roads you use, the routes you take and the places you spend time in. The Movement Plan takes a people-centred approach, putting the people that live in, work in, and visit the borough at the starting point of our journey. This places fairness at the core of our work

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  • DfT Policy Paper - Inclusive Transport Strategy

    Created by Matthew // 1 thread

    https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/inclusive-transport-strategy

    Lots of interesting stuff about inclusive transport regarding trains, buses, cars, public realm, streets and yes a bit about cycling too. Quotes:

    Shared Space:

    8.11 While we consider CIHT and DPTAC’s recommendations and how to take them
    forward, we are requesting that local authorities pause any shared space schemes
    incorporating a level surface they are considering, and which are at the design stage.
    We are also temporarily suspending Local Transport Note 1/11. This pause will allow
    us to carry out research and produce updated guidance.

    Objectives regarding Cycling:

    • Update Local Transport Note 2/08, which sets out the Department’s guidance to
    local authorities on designing safe and inclusive infrastructure for cyclists, to take
    account of developments in cycling infrastructure since its publication in 2008 and
    the responses to the draft AAP consultation and publish a revised version by early
    2019;
    • By 2020, explore the feasibility of amending legislation to recognise the use of
    cycles as a mobility aid71 in order to increase the number of disabled people
    cycling.

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  • Proposals for the Creation of a Major Road Network (London)

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    From the DfT:
    As part of the Transport Investment Strategy, the government committed to creating a Major Road Network (MRN).

    This consultation asks for views on:
    how to define the MRN
    the role that local, regional and national bodies will play in the MRN investment programme
    which schemes will be eligible for MRN funding

    A new MRN would help deliver the following objectives:
    reduce congestion
    support economic growth and rebalancing
    support housing delivery
    support all road users
    support the Strategic Road Network

    The creation of an MRN will allow for dedicated funding from the National Roads Fund to be used to improve this middle tier of our busiest and most economically important local authority ‘A’ roads.

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  • Quietway Consultation in Bromley No2

    The London Borough of Bromley, working with Transport for London, is proposing to
    make a number of improvements between Lower Sydenham and Kent House to
    contribute to the development of a Quietway cycle route between Greenwich and
    Kent House.

    Quietways
    Quietways are walking and cycling routes primarily on lightly trafficked back streets,
    through parks and alongside waterways providing quieter routes away from main
    roads designed to appeal, particularly, to new and inexperienced cyclists. They will
    provide safe and attractive links to shops, stations, schools, workplaces and
    destinations throughout London.

    This particular route is from Greenwich to Kent House station and is an upgrade of
    the existing National Cycle Network Route 21. The route will form part of the London
    wide network of Quietways and Superhighways being developed jointly by London
    Boroughs and Transport for London
    .
    Bridge Road
    At present The National Cycle Network Route 21 runs along Kangley Bridge Road,
    however, due to the number of HGVs this can be an intimidating road for cyclists so
    whilst already popular is likely to discourage significant increases in cycling. This
    new route will upgrade the existing facilities for walking and cycling by providing a
    shared path along the eastern side of the road achieved by widening the footway to
    approximately 3.5m. Removing cyclists from the road will reduce the chance of
    conflict between vehicles and cyclists.

    The project will also seek to make Kangley Bridge Road a more attractive place to
    use and work in as a result of new tree planting and formalised parking, the details of
    which we are keen to establish in dialogue with stakeholders.

    River Pool Path
    It is proposed to widen River Pool Path between Lennard Road and the sharp 90
    degree bend along the path, to make a better quality shared route for pedestrians
    and cyclists. The wider path will enable the marking that currently segregates
    pedestrians and cyclists to be removed as research shows fully shared paths to be
    safer than segregated facilities for both pedestrians and cyclists. These
    improvements will be accompanied by clear new signage denoting the shared
    designation of the path.

    Lennard Road
    It is proposed to replace the existing informal pedestrian crossing between River
    Pool Path and Cator Park across Lennard Road with a new parallel zebra crossing.
    This will enable pedestrians and cyclists to safely cross Lennard Road, improve the
    link between River Pool Path and Cator Park and, thereby, improve the continuity of
    the Quietway route by reducing the severance caused by the road.

    Cator Park
    The route uses the existing cycle path through Cator Park to provide cyclists with a
    safe off-road route that will be more attractive than cycling on the road. To ensure
    the route is safe and secure for use in the evenings, especially during the winter
    months it is proposed to introduce solar powered wayfinding lighting along the
    section of path. The lighting will be unobtrusive and have a minimal environmental
    impact.

    Aldersmead Road
    At the junction of Ringwold Close with Aldersmead Road, it is proposed to introduce
    an informal pedestrian crossing to improve access to Cator Park including improving
    visibility for those exiting Cator Park on foot or by bicycle

    Kings Hall Road
    At the junction of Kings Hall Road with Aldersmead Road it is proposed to replace
    the existing refuge islands with new ones positioned in slightly revised locations to
    make it easier for pedestrians to cross Kings Hall Road. The road markings will also
    be revised to enable cyclists to safely turn from Aldersmead Road to Kings Hall
    Road.

    Kent House Station
    It is proposed to widen a small section of the footway outside the station entrance, in
    order to provide safe and convenient access to the station for cyclists using this
    route and will provide an easy connection to the existing London Cycle Network
    route which continues to Croydon from Kent House Station. It is also proposed to
    improve the public realm at the station entrance with the introduction of trees and
    planters

    Funding is also being sought to improve the quality and quantity of the cycle parking
    provision at the station. This is currently very well utilised and demand for it is
    expected to increase once the Quietway cycle route to the station has been
    delivered.

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  • Quietway Consultation in Bromley

    Created by John H Wood // 1 thread

    Please forgive me if I've mucked this up, I am not very experienced at this.

    The London Borough of Bromley, working with Transport for London (TfL) is proposing to make a number of improvements to streets between Lower Sydenham and Bromley town centre to contribute to the development of a Quietway cycle route between Lower Sydenham and Bromley.

    Quietways
    Quietways are walking and cycling routes primarily on lightly trafficked back streets, through parks and alongside waterways providing quieter routes away from main roads designed to appeal, particularly, to new and inexperienced cyclists. They will provide safe and attractive links to shops, stations, schools, workplaces and destinations throughout London.
    This proposed route is from River Walk in the London Borough of Lewisham to Bromley town centre and will upgrade the section of the existing London Cycle Network route 27 between New Beckenham and Bromley town centre. The route will form part of a London wide network of Quietways and Superhighways being developed jointly by London Boroughs and TfL.

    Worsley Bridge Road
    The Quietway runs along Worsley Bridge Road which, due to the speed and volume of traffic, makes it an unattractive road to cycle on. We are therefore proposing to widen and convert the footway on the southern side of Worsley Bridge Road from the Junction of Copers Cope Road to the junction of South End Lane in Lewisham to a shared footway/cycleway.
    This will provide a high quality facility for cyclists and pedestrians, providing access to Lower Sydenham Station. By providing a shared path cyclists do not need to mix with general traffic thereby improving safety for all road users. The scheme will also introduce a zebra crossing between Meadowview Road and Montana Gardens as well as upgrading the existing refuge at the junction with Copers Cope Road.

    Southend Road
    As the Quietway is required to cross Southend Road, we are proposing to install a Parallel Zebra Crossing for pedestrians and cyclists crossing between Park Road and Foxgrove Road. This crossing will also be of benefit to existing pedestrians, especially for children crossing the road on their way to school.

    Ridley Road to Ravensbourne Road footpath
    In order to provide a safe continuous cycle route it is proposed to allow cycling along the short section of footpath between Ridley Road and Ravensbourne Road, which will be permitted via a Cycle Track Order. Access to the path will be provided via a new dropped kerb at the end of Ridley Road with a new tree or planter installed leading to the path. Vegetation will be cut back to provide additional width for both pedestrians and cyclists and special sinusoidal speed humps for cyclists will be installed at the Ravensbourne Road end of the path to reduce the potential for cyclists to speed entering the shared area.

    Ravensbourne Road
    In order to allow cyclists to access Bromley South Station using the Quietway, it is proposed to allow contra-flow cycling on Ravensbourne Road, which would be achieved by exempting cyclists from the one-way restriction on the street through a combination of signs and markings. Cycle contra-flows provide more direct routes for cyclists and can allow them to avoid travelling on busy roads and are quite common across the UK with several already in place across the Borough.

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  • New London Plan 2017

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    London.gov.uk says:

    What is the new London Plan?
    The London Plan is one of the most important documents for this city.
    It's a strategic plan which shapes how London evolves and develops. All planning decisions should follow London Plan policies, and it sets a policy framework for local plans across London.
    The current 2016 consolidation Plan is still the adopted Development Plan. However the Draft London Plan is a material consideration in planning decisions. It gains more weight as it moves through the process to adoption, however the weight given to it is a matter for the decision maker.

    Consultation on the draft London Plan
    Consultation on this plan is open. Comments will be publicly available. After the consultation, comments are reviewed by an inspector and you may be called in to discuss comments at the Examination in Public.

    What is an Examination in Public?
    At the end of the consultation period your comments will be reviewed by the independent Planning Inspector appointed by the Secretary of State to carry out the Examination in Public for the London Plan.
    You may be invited to discuss your comments at the Examination in Public. All comments will be made available to the public at the end of the consultation period. The legal provisions for the London Plan are in Part VIII of the Greater London Authority (GLA) Act 1999 (as amended) in sections 334 to 341. The Examination in Public is covered in Section 338.

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  • Heavy Goods Vehicles Safety Standard Permit /Direct Vision Standard

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    Tfl says:

    We have undertaken research that shows that in 2015, Heavy Goods Vehicles (HGVs) were involved in disproportionately high numbers of fatal collisions with cyclists (78 per cent) and pedestrians (20 per cent) on London’s streets, despite only making up four per cent of the overall miles driven in the Capital. The Direct Vision Standard (DVS) forms part of The Mayor, Sadiq Khan and TfL’s Vision Zero approach to reducing road danger. The DVS categorises HGVs on the level of the driver’s direct vision from the cab.

    We consulted earlier this year on the principles of a new DVS. Listening to the feedback from this consultation and working closely with industry and stakeholders we have now further developed this scheme. The Consultation report and Responses to Issues Raised document from this first phase of consultation are available to view in from the links at the bottom of this text. The responses showed that, in general, there is support for the principle of a Direct Vision Standard.

    We are now seeking your views on proposals to introduce a new Safety Standard Permit Scheme as part of DVS which widens our approach beyond direct vision and includes a safe system approach to allow us to address a broader range of road danger risks.

    The proposed scheme would require all HGVs over 12 tonnes to hold a Safety Permit to operate in Greater London from 2020. HGVs will be given a rating between ‘zero-star’ (lowest) and ‘five-star’ (highest). Only those vehicles rated ‘one star’ and above would be allowed to enter of operate in London from 2020. Zero rated vehicles would only be allowed if they can prove compliance through safe system measures. By 2024 only ‘three-star’ rated HGVs and above would automatically be given a Safety Permit. HGVs rated two star and below would need to demonstrate increased safety through progressive safe system measures.

    The safe system could include specific industry recognised measures such as sensors, visual warnings and comprehensive driver training. The Safety Standard Permit scheme would evolve over time, taking into account advances in technology.

    Detailed information about the scheme and the approach in which we have arrived at our current proposals are set out in the consultation document. A full Integrated Impact Assessment is also included.

    The consultation approach
    We are undertaking a phased consultation approach at key stages of the development of the consultation proposals to implement the Direct Vision Standard:

    Phase 1 (24 January to 18 April 2017) – we set out the case for HGV driver direct vision and consulted on the Mayor of London’s outline proposals to introduce a Direct Vision Standard for HGVs in London and the principles of the Standard itself. The responses showed that, in general, there is support for the principle of a Direct Vision Standard.

    Phase 2a – policy consultation (this consultation) – this current phase of consultation seeks views and feedback on the scheme proposals as outlined above and within the supporting consultation document which includes supporting technical reports including the full Integrated Impact Assessment. Feedback from this phase of consultation will be used to develop a second IIA and finalise the scheme proposals to be included in phase 2b of the consultation.

    Phase 2b - Final scheme proposals and statutory consultation (Spring/Summer 2018) – this final phase will consult on the final proposals for the HGV Safety Standard Permit Scheme, including statutory consultation on the appropriate regulatory measure to ban or restrict HGVs in London under the scheme, subject to UK Government and European Commission support and notification.

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  • London Assembly cycling infrastructure investigation

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    London Assembly says:

    Our investigation
    Over recent years, TfL policy has increasingly focused on the construction of physical cycling infrastructure on London’s roads. A change in direction towards more segregated infrastructure followed our report in 2012 recommending this approach.

    Our investigation will cover the full range of cycling infrastructure in London, with a particular focus on:

    Cycle Superhighways: a form of cycle lane, designed to make cycling safer by helping keep cyclists away from general traffic, and offer direct and continuous cycling on major routes.

    Quietways: a network of cycle routes that link key destinations, improving safety and convenience through small-scale interventions.

    Mini-Hollands: TfL schemes to invest neighbourhood-level improvements in walking and cycling, involving a range of interventions in each area.

    Cycle parking: provision of parking spaces on-street, at stations or in dedicated parking facilities.

    It is important that TfL is able to establish the effectiveness of the infrastructure it installs on London’s roads. We are concerned that to date there has been no comprehensive study of the new infrastructure’s impact on cycling safety, modal share and other road users.

    Questions to answer:

    1. What progress on new cycling infrastructure has been made under Sadiq Khan, and what are his long-term plans?
    2. Has TfL resolved the problems that delayed some cycling schemes under the previous Mayor?
    3. Has segregation delivered the anticipated benefits on the Cycle Superhighways? How many cyclists are using these routes?
    4. To what extent has segregation had negative consequences for other road users and, if necessary, how can this be mitigated?
    5. Have Quietways delivered their anticipated benefits? How many cyclists are using them?
    6. What are the differences in infrastructure between inner and outer London? How can TfL ensure infrastructure in different areas is sufficient and appropriate to the location?
    7. How will TfL’s new ‘Strategic Cycling Analysis’ help determine where and how to invest in infrastructure?
    8. How appropriate is the 400-metre target set in the draft Transport Strategy? Can we equate proximity with access?
    9. Is TfL’s approach to public engagement working effectively to improve scheme designs and meet stakeholder needs?
    10. Are Londoners sufficiently aware of the cycling infrastructure available to them, and how can awareness be increased?
    11. How is TfL using infrastructure to attract a more diverse range of people to cycle in London?
    12. Is there sufficient cycle parking in London, and is it in the right locations?
    13. How are the lessons of the Mini-Hollands and other previous cycling schemes being applied elsewhere?
    14. Should cycling infrastructure be oriented toward longer-distance commuting journeys, or more localised trips?

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